Narrative Style In Maus: A Survivor's Tale

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Both Art Spiegelman and Anthony Doerr have unique writing styles which are evident throughout each novel. Art Spiegelman, the author of Maus: A Survivor's Tale, has a rather conversational writing style. The plot follows Vladek's less than perfect English dialect while he tells his Holocaust experience to his son, Art. Anthony Doerr, the author of All the Light We Cannot See, possesses more of a narrative style, considering the point of view is third person omniscient. The story is told by analyzing the major characters thoughts and feelings. Art Spiegelman and Anthony Doerr have different writing styles that can be discovered through point of view, dialogue, and the characters actions. Spiegelman displays a conversational writing style in the novel Maus: A Survivor's Tale. The majority of this piece is dialogue, as Vladek Spiegelman conveys his tragic involvement with the Holocaust as Art replies. An example of this can be found on page 16, "But, Pop...Mom's name was Anna Zylberberg" and Vladek replies, saying "All this was before I met Anja—just listen, yes?" (Spiegelman 16). This is just one of many examples of the conversation between the father and son. This continues through the whole plot, therefore the main author style in this novel is conversational. …show more content…
This is shown through a third person omniscient point of view while the story is told, getting a deeper perspective by knowing the major character's state of mind. An example of this point of view is shown when Doerr is describing a preference of Werner's, saying "Werner’s favorites are five faded frescoes on the ceilings of the grandest upper rooms," (Doerr 7). This quote shows that the author does ponder the characters feelings, showing third person omniscient. This point of view greatly contributed to the narrative style of All the Light We Cannot

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