Narrative About Swimming

950 Words 4 Pages
“It’s the first day. How bad can it be?” I asked Amy as we walked into the pool area for the first time with our brand new goggles in hand. “They are not going to make us do anything too terrible since it is our very first day,” Amy replied with confidence. I thought she was probably right; all of the sports that I have ever been apart of have never scared me away within the first week, but this is swim and I knew nothing about swimming. We sat in the circle with all of the experienced swimmers and other newbies while our new coaches sat in the center. Mr. Page and Mrs. Marion looked at us and smiled as our information papers and swim caps were handed to us. “How’s it going? Are you ready to swim?” Mr. Page asked us with enthusiasm. We …show more content…
His eyes flashed back and forth between Amy and I, while he waited for a response. “I don’t really know,” Amy and I both said in a humorous tone. Honestly, we had no clue what strokes or events there were. “Alright, we will find you something to do!” He told us before he yelled, “Time to get into the pool for a 400 warm-up!” We had no idea how many laps were in a 400 or how to properly swim, but we slapped on our caps and goggles anyway. Amy jumped into the pool first causing a huge wave of cold water to slam against my body. “Are you getting in?” Amy asked, so I took the …show more content…
do this,” I managed to spit out in between wet coughs and heavy breathing. I could tell Amy was not feeling too well either. Her red face and heavy breathing was enough to convince anyone that swimming would not be the sport for us. “This is just the warm-up,” Amy said with a look of exasperation. This was the defining moment of our Junior year. If we quit, then we would be spared from the agony of early morning practices, freezing waters, and scaly skin; however, if we stayed we would be in really great shape. In reality, I could probably run all winter and save myself a lot of trouble and sleep than if I would stay in swim, but I knew that my cross country and track coaches were right when they told me that swimming would help me. “Let’s just go,” Amy said. I knew we were staying now. We finished our 400 warm-up and waited patiently for the next step of our practice. The other swimmers began to talk about when they swam as kids and that when they were seven, they too thought the warm up was difficult. During their days in age group swim, the faster, more experienced swimmers, were deemed “sharks”, and the younger or more inexperienced kids were the “dolphins”. I figured that I probably did not even qualify as a dolphin and felt that I swam more like seahorse: awkward, slow, and latching onto anything that could possibly keep me from

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