My Wonderful Education In Skitzland Analysis

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My Wonderful Education in Skitzland “The Fairy tale teaches the spiritual essentials, which facts alone cannot communicate.” (Ostry) Is “My wonderful Adventure in Skitzland” simply a fairy tale or a lesson on social reform filled to the brim with satire? Henry Morley wrote the story to be published in Household Words on January 6, 1850 not only for the fanciful enjoyment of the reader but also for the education of the middle classes. Henry Morley not only was a lecturer, writer and a schoolmaster but also a physician. This, I would guess, aided him in his writing of the fairy tale. But alas “He was, in fact, a born writer and educator.” (Banerjee) Morley had a large impact on education in the Victorian era. He established a school …show more content…
He digs for months and finally breaks through to a new land, Skitzland. To his misfortune, he falls right through the sky and lands on a coach headed to Skitzland into a seat that was already taken by Baron Terror’s eyes. Although one eye did not survive the other did witness this murder and runs off to get the strong arms of the law. During the coach ride the farmer finds out that on the twenty first birthday of the citizens of Skitzland they lose any body part they failed to educate. He soon realizes that he is in the company of skeletons with stomachs and very few other parts, and the only complete citizens are the forty-two upper classmen. After being arrested by large arms, he is whisked away to jail with a trail to follow soon after. During the trial; there were three tongues to defend him to the judges; who consisted of a brain, a mouth, and an ear. He was of course convicted and sent to death. The death sentence consisted of being shot out of a cannon where the crime was committed. Before the execution he was permitted three hours to do as he pleased. During that time he visited the churches, the Opera and the poor before being shot from a cannon through the hole he fell …show more content…
“The 1876 Royal Commission on the Factory Acts recommended that education be made compulsory in order to stop child labour.” (The 1870 Education Act) By the 1880’s education was required for everyone between the ages of five and ten. Today with free education for everyone there are still churches with pews filled with ears and some women still being carried like dolls, you have to wonder what Skitzland looks like

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