My Utopian School District Analysis

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Criticisms of schools and districts across the nation are endless. As an educator who advocates for progressive schools and less traditional teaching strategies, having the ability to dictate details of my own utopian school district seemed like a fun, easy challenge—until I started trying to type. Running a whole school district entails a vast number of responsibilities and details to consider. This is one of the reasons I have zero interest in pursuing an administrative role. However, like the loose guidelines of this assignment, I’m also attempting to loosely describe my ideal district. One challenge I faced with this vision is my limited exposure to buildings or grade levels other than secondary. I can easily discuss plans for a high school, …show more content…
The system would run similar to that of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) like special education students currently have in place. When I think about the attention IEPs place on students’ needs and goals, it only makes sense that the perfect school district would utilize such plans for all. However, the IEP process requires a great deal of time and effort. To have IEPs for all students, districts would need to employ a much larger staff. Many more counselors would be needed to meet with and assess each student’s learning styles, personal goals, and basic human needs. Additional teachers would be necessary as most students would likely need smaller class sizes and more one-on-one instruction. Honestly, the list of additional staff could continue for paragraphs because I’m not sure there could ever be enough educators and school staff members involved in students’ learning. From administrators to counselors, nurses, tutors, and bus drivers, the utopian school district would ideally be able to hire countless …show more content…
First of all, the perfect district would never threaten teachers with standardized test pressure, and it would consistently put ethics before politics. Since money and governmental edicts aren’t an issue for the district, administrators will never need to force teachers to analyze MAP or EOC data. Teachers won’t have to teach to the test—emphasizing concepts otherwise not essential to the subject area. Teachers will have multiple opportunities to get assistance with their classroom teaching through professional development and helpful instructional coaches who will actually spend time in classrooms, trying to help teachers teach—rather than forcing them into offices to work on pushing technology trends onto teachers, as is common in my personal teaching experience. Before evaluating a teacher, a principal would visit the classroom on multiple occasions, observing different class periods throughout the day, and conduct both scheduled and pop-in

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