My Teaching Philosophy: My Personal Philosophy Of Education

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Philosophy of Education Defining a teaching philosophy six weeks into my formal teacher training is a tricky thing. I feel as if every time I turn around, I see something new and shiny to play with and explore. I am sure, ten years from now, I will look back on this and laugh lovingly at my naïve views and ten years after that, laugh again, maybe for different reasons. Hopefully, in the following decade, I’ll retire. However, in order to start, I need to know where I am going in the first place, otherwise, everything is nebulous and I will flounder and wander around with no purpose. Maybe I will change my ideas and direction as I gain experience and wisdom. Honestly, I hope I do. I would hate to be rigid and unable to learn. It is an attitude …show more content…
According to some researchers, that number can extend beyond 40. Among those named are educator, authority, leader, advisor, friend, innovator, model, consultant, mentor, and mediator (Ivanova, 2010). It is the role of a professional teacher to do all of these things. As an educator, teachers give the information to the student. As an authority we maintain control of the classroom and ensure students are given the consistent boundaries all children need. Advisors are needed to give gentle guidance and sometimes a teacher is a child’s only friend in a harsh world. Teachers are required to stay abreast of the latest technology and information in our fields of study. We must be models of moral and ethical behavior. We are consultants on projects and mentors as our pupils move on and sometimes surpass our own achievements. Teachers are also mediators between students and their peers, other faculty, and sometimes parents. Looking at this list and knowing there are many more attributes to add, it seems a daunting task, yet I have only to see all of the amazing teachers in my own life, to know it is possible and …show more content…
I teach at a site-based, hybrid online school. Art classes are taught on-site and core classes are taught online, but there is a content teacher on-site as well. Our site has an English teacher. One positive about our art curriculum is that we develop the curriculum ourselves, so we are collaborating with other teachers and professionals in our art field and developing a curriculum specially designed to meet the needs of our school and the classes are taught by professionals in the field. The online portion has strong academic content, but poor execution. Students are entirely self-paced and they have a difficult time with that level of self-regulation. The positive is that we are able to see the struggle and are in the process of revamping the online portion to create an atmosphere more similar to a college online experience. The local school district has also allowed us to develop some art content, approved by the state as core content, to be taught on-site, such as dance history (history) and anatomy and kinesiology (science). We are in the process of writing curriculum for theatre history and dramatic literature (English), to be presented in the same way, by next spring. This school is an art school specifically designed for students who know they want to pursue a career in the arts. It is not a school for

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