My Reasons Of Homeschooling Our Children In Public School

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Some parents have to disagree with the article because of their experience with homeschooling. A mom got to tell her story on the website, "I’ve been homeschooling my children (ages 10, 8, and 3) since September. Like many of the commenters on the New York Times, I too was concerned about my kids missing out on interaction with other kids and the social aspect of public school. That fear was quickly squelched. My kids play with other kids on the block almost daily and all of my kids are involved in extracurricular activities such as soccer, basketball, Taekwondo, music lessons, and the local Boys and Girls Club, in addition to all of our church activities. Plus, they take part in a homeschool co-op on Fridays with 40 other kids. It turns out …show more content…
"My wife and I decided to homeschool our children this year for a variety of reasons. One of the main reasons we chose to do so was the flexibility that homeschooling provides. Because of our flexible schedule, we have been able to travel through Europe and explore our wonderful city. We have several more trips planned over the next months, none of which we could do if we weren’t homeschooling." (My Reasons for Homeschooling: A Response to a New York Times Article) "There are other benefits to homeschooling. We had noticed that our children’s innate love of learning was being replaced by frustration, fatigue, and dread. The source? Overemphasis on standardized testing and increased homework demands. Our oldest was in school from 8:00 until 4:30 each day, and would have a stack of assignments to complete when he came home. Some nights, we didn’t finish the homework until an hour after bedtime. On those nights, my son would complain, “But I didn’t even have a chance to play today!” He has a lifetime to learn, but childhood is …show more content…
Children pulled from public schools, whether enrolled in privately-funded or voucher-supported religious schools, charter schools, or educated at home by their parents, miss a key component of public education: learning to coexist in a democratic society. Furthermore, if the trend away from public schools continues, the expertise of educators will give way solely to religious organizations, big business, or parents; equal educational opportunities will no longer exist and socioeconomic segregation will intensify." (Williams,

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