My Observation Of Celebrate The Children In Denville

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November 4th, I attended Celebrate the Children in Denville. The school was in a beautiful location, and was awed but the front entrance. Aesthetic aside, I learned a lot from that experience. We first enter to find Ms. Shipley working in a one on one setting with a little boy. It seemed like they were working on naming different shapes that were drawn on the board utilizing an AAC device and orally naming the shape as well. Once they finished naming the shapes, the boy tried to leave the therapy room, but they still were not done with the session. In order to maintain the child’s interest, Ms. Shipley gave him the opportunity to play on the swing. Once on the swing, they started counting backwards from 10 to 1. Once they were done on the swing, …show more content…
Shipley and another SLP colleague. We observed a Pre-K classroom that had 1 typically developing child and then 1 special needs child. Ms. Shipley, her colleague, the classroom teacher, and the special needs child’s PARA (Para Professional) all worked together with the day’s activity called, “Name that Tune”. They started the activity by introducing some of the different songs to the children. Ms. Shipley found the songs via Youtube on the iPad and played them for the children. They would sing along, and use hand gestures throughout the song. Some of these songs included: 5 Little Monkeys, The Wheels on the Bus, Where is Thumbkin, and Heads Shoulders Knees & Toes. After playing the songs, they children had to utilize the iPad to either state, I know it, or I don’t know it. At the beginning of the lesson, the SLPs each took turns demonstrating the proper order in which the children should press the buttons on the iPad to state what they needed to say. The TD child communicated both orally and utilizing the iPad, which I thought was great to allow the special needs child to feel less different. At times, the child had difficulties in raising his hands and pressing the appropriate buttons, and thus the SLP would initiate the action by raising his arm, or moving his hand towards the correct button, but not pressing it using his finger. Usually, after the first initiation the child would be able to perform the same action 2-3 …show more content…
Ms. Shipley and her colleague were utilizing the same activity with this group. They started off with the, “Who Do I See?” song where they named the person sitting next to them (left & right) either orally or utilizing the iPad. 2 children were able to orally sing the song, while the other 2 utilized the iPad. The main difference with this group was that the SLPs really needed to support each other in order to provide the necessary attention to each child. Since the last group was so small, there was little to no need to divide up their attention, but it was a lot more necessary here. I noticed that 2 children began getting restless at first when they the SLPs were focusing on another child, but once one SLP gave both of them her attention they started to calm down. Some nice things that I noticed the SLPs do was saying, “Fix it” or “Fix that sound”, when one of the children said something incorrectly. I also liked they did something called, “Give me Five”, where the child and the SLP would repeat a sound 5 times such as, /ma/ /ba/ or

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