My Lady's Presence Makes The Roses Red By Anne Bradstreet Analysis

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Love is perhaps the most commonly written about thing in the world. It is something that all beings of the earth can experience, and that humankind has cherished and celebrated since the beginnings of civilization. Poetry, a beautiful art that is expressed by word rather than images, is a popular outlet for love to be expressed. The poems “To My Dear and Loving Husband” written by Anne Bradstreet and Henry Constable’s “My Lady’s Presence Makes the Roses Red” are two examples of love poems that express great joy and celebrate the beauty and simplicity that love can bring, in addition to telling of the author’s loves and how wonderful they are. The poem “My Lady’s Presence Makes the Roses Red” is a fourteen line Italian sonnet written in …show more content…
It demonstrates iambic pentameter, along with rhyming couplets in a rhyme scheme of AABBCCDD followed by an EEFF. This can be easily noticed when the poem is read aloud, as the last word in each line rhymes following this pattern. The poem is a love letter written to Bradstreet’s husband, who she loves with all her heart. In it she gives example after example of how she loves him dearly, such as in line five, where she says “I prize thy more than whole mines of gold”, which is no small statement. Bradstreet is able to express that she has found true love and happiness with her husband, as “If ever two were one, then surely we” (1), implying unity and trust in their relationship, as the line demonstrates that they love and know each other so well they are almost as one …show more content…
The most obvious difference is their type, as “My Lady’s Presence Makes the Roses Red” is written as an Italian sonnet and “To My Dear and Loving Husband” is written in iambic pentameter. The latter poem is also shorter, having two less lines than the first. A second example of their difference is that Constable is in a one sided relationship, where only his affection is found. He is almost in a state of purgatory, for he loves this woman so dearly and yet is in such pain (as demonstrated by his bleeding heart and tears) for the same reason. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Bradstreet could not be happier in her marriage as her poem sings of her love for darling. Bradstreet also seems to love her husband for all his qualities, as she does not zoom in on one single thing, but rather discusses how she loves him completely and could not live without him. Constable is focused on the physical aspect of this anonymous woman in this poem, only sparing two lines for a nonphysical feature on her. This is seen when he compares her to the sun, implying she is warm and

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