My Experience In Mali

810 Words 4 Pages
The republic of Mali is located in western Africa, with a population of around 15 million people. Making it the 24th largest country in the world. Mali also is notably one of the poorest countries in the world. Last summer, I had the opportunity to travel alongside with other students as part of the Students Travel and Exposure South Africa (STAESA) to provide a helping hand to the people of the village of Tiby, which is located in the southern region of the city of Segou. The STAESA is nonprofit organization that offers a variety of volunteer programs in African countries. As volunteers, we worked along with locals to renovate the local orphanage. We also helped dig trenches for water systems, lay foundations for schools, plant crops and so …show more content…
Mali is considered one of the worst countries to live in as a woman. I was really shocked to learn that as of now, there are no laws that abolish female genital mutilation in Mali. I learned while talking with the mothers and young ladies in the village of Tiby how many women are forced into early marriage. I met with a group of young women, between the ages of 12 and 16, who actively fight to end want is known as an endless war in Mali against women. I spoke with Fatoumata, a 14 year old young feminist, who is passionate about bringing global awareness to the injustice women face in the country. I expected her to be a little more cautious while she expressed her views to us but did not seem to care who heard her. Her bravery, boldness, and passion was infectious. She motivated me to not only take a stand on such pressing matters but to also actively engage myself in the fight for …show more content…
I felt so bad about how underprivileged they were. I later came to understand that poverty was a national issue. In fact, half of Mali 's population live below the international poverty line. I went from feeling bad and sympathetic to feeling guilty. I could not help but reminisce on the privileges that I take for granted on a daily basis. Even though it was not part of our initial plan, we made arrangements to get some bags of millet, wheat, and corn seeds. We worked together with locals to plant the crops before leaving. It is hard, if not impossible, genuinely appreciate the education, clean water, electricity and food we have as Americans because we are not accustomed to not having them. The children in Tiby told me of their dreams to come to America as if it was magical place. I could sincerely tell from the eyes of these children that they would anything to be in my place. I am very privilege in more ways than I am willing to be grateful for. This experience really helped me realize

Related Documents