My Bondage And My Freedom And Frederick Douglass Analysis

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The readings from week five portray and consist of various authors narratively explaining their personal journeys and experiences through life. In particular, the works of Phillis Wheatley and Frederick Douglass. Of all the works of these two famous slaves, the two works that stood out the most were On Being Brought From Africa to America, by Wheatley, alongside the work My Bondage and My Freedom, by Douglass which were both similar and different for valuable reasons.
Wheatley was a female African American who wrote poems, and was the first woman and African American to come out with a book of poems. Her work On Being Brought for Africa to America is written with her as the speaker and the author. She describes how she is thankful to be removed
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While she included the racial injustice she endured as an African American, Wheatley uses the majority of her poem to talk about the salvation she has received. Her style of this particular poem is conveyed through her use of strong language. Her vivid word choices help deliver her message of how being forcefully taken from Africa, actually saved her. She used the word benighted to describe her soul before she met Christ. The word benighted in this context means to be overtaken with darkness. Describing her native land as pagan adds to the context of her saying her soul was benighted. From what I gathered, she is saying that the darkness of her soul came from a lack of knowing God, and because of the practices most African tribes partake in. Wheatley makes her points in this poem with her description of being saved and the fact that all races can be saved by the Lord. The entire poem, she writes about how God’s mercy saved her from Africa and through being saved from Africa her soul was able to meet and be saved by the Father. She talks about how through being saved she was able to see why God saved her from Africa, but that even though she is thankful for being saved, she sees the fact that the white man still views all of the Africans as being beneath them and not worthy of God’s love. In the last two lines of her poem, Wheatley writes about how no matter the color of a …show more content…
It can be inferred that the owner who had essentially betrayed Douglass only thinking from a monetary perspective, and traded Douglass over in order to gain money from his buyer, but it is not implied by Douglass. He later describes his account to escape since he was desperate and without hope. This is the central message of Douglass’s narrative, that he was so weak and beaten that he was desperate for a change in his circumstances: “Life, in itself, had almost become burdensome to me, All my outward relations were against me” (Levine 1230). Douglass conveys his message in the complex and articulate sentences he writes, and also by addressing the reader multiple times throughout the narrative. He also uses vivid imagery and well-described events to convey his message. Another message Douglass conveys is that he is better than the white man without the need of superstitious influence. He had the roots from his friend Sandy which were supposed to protect him from being beaten by his owner, but they did not work: “I now forgot my roots, and remembered my pledge to stand up in my own defense” (Levine 1233). Also, when his master

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