Analysis Of Camaraderie In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Camaraderie, the mutual relation that has the power to interconnect society, is imperative in the lives of creatures to guarantee well-being as illustrated through the interactions of the characters in Mary Shelley’s gothic novel Frankenstein. Mary Shelley argues that companionship balances out the unwanted qualities of a person, while also providing a sense of acceptance in an otherwise judgemental society. As stories and wisdom is exchanged between comrades, Shelley sees this as beneficial because personal growth is achieved. Mary Shelley insists that companions are able to subdue the darker traits of a persona, and are therefore able to bring out the better side of it. One such example is between Victor Frankenstein and his adopted …show more content…
An instance of the contrary situation is illustrated in the abandoned monster. Frankenstein’s creation is neglected and shunned in every encounter with society, whether it is by ferocious villagers, his own creator, or even the people he views as his makeshift family, the DeLaceys. Despite the monster’s other needs, the one wish he puts above all else is a companion. He desires “a creature of another sex, but as hideous as myself. . .Our lives will be. . . harmless and free from the misery I now feel” (Shelley 135). If the monster’s demand was met, the acquirement of a companion and in turn love, he would not have turned to a life of crime and vengeance. The lack of love not only caused the monster to “ [murder] the lovely and the helpless, . .[strangle] the innocent as they slept and [grasp] to death his throat who never injured [him]”, it also shaped his hateful view towards society (Shelley 204). Ironically, the monster’s creator also falls into a similar circumstance. Victor becomes depressed and feverishly ill after Clerval 's death, and seems to be getting worse and worse with the passing of time - approaching the verge of death. It does not help that the town Frankenstein is forced to remain in believes he is a criminal; in fact, a nurse who loaths him is forced to look after …show more content…
Although knowledge can be harmful, Shelley overwhelmingly demonstrates how it is beneficial. This is a phenomenon experienced by the monster when he listens to the daily conversation of the DeLaceys. The family’s discussion enabled the monster to learn the art of language, world history, and reading comprehension. The monster astonishingly states,“these people possessed a method of communicating. . By great application . .I discovered the names that were given to the most familiar objects” (Shelley 100). The knowledge the creation acquires not only matures him, but it also opens the eyes of the monster, bringing him to the realization there is much more to the world than he is aware of. This personal achievement also sparks hope in the monster, for he now believes he has a shot at fitting into society. Another example of personal growth being achieved through social interactions is with Walton. At the start, Walton was ambitious, hungry for glory, and willing to stop at nothing to achieve his goal. These qualities closely resembled a young Victor, and seeing this Frankenstein decides to share his tragedy with Walton in hopes that he can learn from his mistakes. By the end of the tragic narrative, Walton comprehends, “that the lives of all these men are endangered through me. If we are lost, my mad schemes are

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