Musical Theatre Essay

Improved Essays
A rising art form in popular culture today is none other than the American musical theatre. An array of factors have emerged and collided over the past decade to bring what was once a niche staple of American culture to the forefront of the media and culture around the world. The sum of an evolving variety of music genres within the form, an increased interest and engagement by A and B list celebrities, an increasingly globalized Western culture, among other influences have allowed for the growth and current peak prosperity of the musical theatre genre across many platforms and international lines. The reintroduction of the live television broadcast of musicals on major television networks, the most coveted and promoted major holiday season …show more content…
They should exist as mediators between realism and romanticism - with a mind for both the art and the business of it all. This is unfortunately not the case within the current musical theatre market. Producers of new Broadway musicals have been engaging in pattern-like behaviors as their interests are placed in the immediate monetization of the art, rather than the prosperity and artistry of the genre. This holds true for the rest of the musical theatre world outside of Broadway, as the top-down model of the industry suggests that musicals will most often only get produced around the world if they find some level of success on Broadway first. The shift in focus of musical theatre producers from artistry to monetization is evidenced in their decisions of which shows to develop and invest in to be produced on Broadway, a theatre complex that is widely viewed as the peak and center of the musical theatre world. The pattern that has become increasingly obvious in today’s market is the adaptation of famous films into musicals. If one looks at the list of shows currently running or expected to open in the near future on Broadway, the ratio of original stories and concepts to shows based on Hollywood movies is outrageously weighted to the latter (Viagas, …show more content…
Musical theatre endeavors see their greatest successes in trendsetting and breaking the molds currently in place. This is congruent with the entire notion of creativity, which is about breaking boundaries and introducing new forms to solve problems and make progress. New discoveries and initiatives in the musical theatre industry and the success that follow can be seen in the recent phenomenon of Hamilton: An American Musical. This show is an exception to the current creative rut and is a prime example of musical theatre finding its success in breaking current barriers. It has found itself at the center of this outbreak of musical theatre from its once niche market to popular culture. The show introduced completely diverse casting, the musical genres of Hip-Hop and R&B, and the adaptation of an unlikely story into an unlikely medium. These introductions to the musical theatre community were an important step in the way of becoming a more inclusive, accessible, and innovative art form for the population. However, Leslie Odom Jr., one of the stars made famous by this production, stated in a recent interview that even though Broadway has just finished arguably its most diverse, innovative, and game-changing season in history, he does not see the future of musical theatre reflecting these advents at all. He fears a future series of Broadway seasons where producers

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Juke Box Musical Analysis

    • 2396 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Because the Musical is told like a documentary you get to see the ways that the band interacted and what caused some of these hits to be created. Jersey Boys can be entertaining heart breaking and fascinating at the same time. Jersey Boys is by far one of the best Juke Box Musicals. After Jersey Boys it seemed as though there wasn’t going to be a Juke Box Musical that could out do it, and there wasn’t. After the Successes of Mamma Mia and Jersey Boys Broadway became over saturated by Juke Box Musicals and there became less and less original works.…

    • 2396 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    There were many guests singing along with every song during the show. The audience appeared to be caught up in the moment and loving the musical. The production/playwright wanted to bring the popular 1980’s Dirty Dancing movie to the big stage and they did an amazing job. The musical was definitely a huge hit and was worth every penny spent to produce it. I was amazed by this musical, not only because I love the movie but also because they brought the movie to life on stage.…

    • 1230 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    the play representing a unique fusion of Rodgers’ musical comedy and Hammerstein’s operetta. This was the milestone in the development of American musicals, it also marked the beginning of a very successful partnership in Broadway musical history and was shortly followed by Carousel (1945), Allegro (1947), South Pacific (1949), The King and I (1951), Flower Drum Song (1958) and The Sound of Music (1959). In this study, it will demonstrate “integration” elements in the musical of Rodger’s and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! (Oklahoma! – The Stage Musical (31st March 1943, Broadway) and how the songs involved in the musical develop the story and expanded the characters out even…

    • 1848 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It’s Possible! The importance of Richard Rodgers What does the sound of music, Oklahoma, South Pacific, and Cinderella have in common. They have the music written by the Richard Rodgers. Richard Rodgers helped change the face of Broadway musicals, he changed them by giving them each individual stories that made them both memorable and loveable. This essay will discuss how Richard Rodger early life affected his work, his legacy, and the importance of his work.…

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They have inspired Broadway hits, such as Kiss Me Kate from Shakespeare 's The Taming of the Shrew or West Side Story from his Romeo and Juliet. They have been made into countless film adaptations, which feature Shakespeare 's stories deposited into settings ranging from American drug gangs to Great Britain in 1930s (Dunton-Downer & Riding 472–473). All of this was possible because Shakespeare wrote plays that are both widely applicable, and reflective of human nature. Not only can people adapt his work and apply it to a variety of situations, but they also want…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Composers from across the continent were writing music and operas attempting to emulate and use (what they thought to be) flamenco themes. The cafés cantantes were replaced with theaters and larger venues suitable to stage these new operas and works. Music in the flamenco style and aesthetic were mixed with other popular styles of music in Europe and presented for middle-class audiences. Strictly speaking, in this time flamenco was at a peak popularity, just appearing in different forms. The beginnings of flamenco ballet appeared in theaters in Moscow and London in the early 20th centiry.…

    • 2039 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    How uniformity, deep levels of comprehension, and the yearning to enlighten people intertwine together make theatre everlasting. Even the spelling of theatre compared to theater had a level of comprehension resonating in it. While the term theater is more synonymous with American English, theatre is commonly known on a global scale. While theater can be perceived a form of entertainment and profitable venue, theatre is much more complex than those qualities. Theatre is an art form.…

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Still enjoying great success half a century after it’s first release, the Sound of Music franchise is an interesting phenomenon. Although it has roots in the von Trapp’s tale, the form was morphed beyond the facts and became an entirely new creation. Their story has been told through several mediums, most notable of which are music, theatre and film. As one of the most successful musicals of all time, the catchy tunes and deceptively simple lyrics played a pivotal role, augmenting the adaptations and providing the backbone for the works. The Broadway musical was the first popular portrayal of the von Trapps, and gave the franchise a boost to fame.…

    • 1124 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The ability to influence not through just words alone, but through the power of music, dance and acting combined. The research will describe the career of a musical theatre performer what is required to become a successful musical theatre performer, and the impact of a musical theatre performer has society. Musical theatre was originally started in Paris and Vienna in the early 1800’s. The musicals roots are from the French and Viennese operettas. Works from the French playwright Jacques Offenbach and the romantic comedy playwright Johann Strauss II were the first musicals to gain nationwide popularity.…

    • 1360 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The World Goes Round at Theatre UCF was a spectacular conglomeration of musical performances that were brought to life through excellent acting and use of lighting. Throughout my years as a student I have seen a plethora of plays ranging from high school productions to off-off Broadway. Walking into this production I expected the same level of performance as in my local community college (with a slightly bigger budget). However, after the first song I knew that I was going to be proven wrong. Featuring a myriad of Broadway hits, the soundtrack of this performance is what you would expect on a show-tunes playlist.…

    • 778 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays