Music Stimulation Therapy Case Study

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Researchers are always searching for new and creative ways to consider and repair one of our most precious and sensitive organs, the brain. Here we are, in 2016, finding that one of the best solutions after all may also be the one no one was expecting, music therapy. Music therapy is one of the fastest growing fields in this generation, and every year that the programs improve, more lives are saved. There have been many instances where the study of the effect of music in the brain has been deeply observed, but in this particular case it is being looked at in a specific setting; after a stroke has occurred in the right hemisphere of the brain, resulting in major unilateral neglect. In the article “Pleasant music improves visual attention in …show more content…
Although the studies were focusing on different issues, the results seem to be rather similar in a way that music seems to help. In this particular study, the patient suffers from chronic stroke. The goal here was to use Music Stimulation Therapy (MST) to try and increase the plasticity in the patient’s sensorimotor cortex, to recover some of the movement in her arm and hand functions from partial paresis. The use of instruments (a midi piano and electronic drum set) stressed the exercise of her fine motor skills, that needed attention. She had over 20 MST sessions, each with added difficulty, and by the end of the sessions she could start playing patterns of notes and even some children’s nursery songs by herself. The positive results of her MST were proven in …show more content…
17 different individuals partook in this study, with the goal of improving mobility and strength in their newfound lack of movements. The specific therapy, Ronnie Gardiner Rhythm and Music Therapy (RGRM) is a special type of rehabilitation therapy, where the use of colors, sounds, and muscles all fit into one session. Basically, patients are using a sound, beat, word, or projected color to associate with a physical movement, like finger wiggling or clapping. Over the ten-week period of classes, the results were pretty phenomenal. Many of the patients claimed at the end that they learned to love and connect with their “new bodies” and even showed significant improvement in things such as fine motor skills and posture. Many of them had a new sense of boosted energy and belief in themselves to accomplish new tasks and

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