Music: Humanly Organized Music Analysis

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I hardly agree with Bakan’s third proposition, which states that “sound are organized into music by people; Thus, music is a form of humanly organized sound”. I don’t believe that music should be defined as humanly organized sound since music means differently to different people. Music can be any kind of sound, as long as the one listening to it considers it as a form of music.
First of all, I believe any sound that an animal makes alone is a form of music. In the book, Bakan thinks that only when a human being uses a given sound for musical purposes, such as sound of birds and whales, does that sound actually enter into the domain of “music”. However, I believe the sound itself is music. Ron Hoy, professor of neurobiology and behavior at Cornell University, states that music is strictly an
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Many people, for example, some hippies from 60s really like the sound of whales, therefore the whale sound can be considered as music to them. Bio musicologists also suggest that not only are the sounds of some animals pleasing, but they are also composed with the same musical language that humans use. For instance whales use many of the musical concepts found in human music, including similar rhythms, phrase lengths and song structure. Birds are also considered as musicians because they song follow rhythmic patterns and pitches that are in tune with human music. Atema from the Science article believes that these similarities suggest that there may be a “universal music”: one that unites all—human and animal. Therefore, I do believe, without any human arrangement, sound from animals and nature can be considered as music.
Second, I believe that any sound can be considered as music solely. John Cage is a famous American composer and has been lauded as one of the most influential American composers of 20th century. He is best

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