Music Analysis: 'I Get A Kick Out Of You'

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Written Assignment #1 During the 1920’s and 1930’s Broadway musicals became incredibly popular amongst the American people. Although a number of these musicals were not known historically, numerous songs produced were later made memorable by famous singers. For example, the song “I Get a Kick Out of You,” was written by songwriter Cole Porter in 1931. It wasn’t till 1938 that the song became memorable by the Broadway musical Anything Goes performed by Ethel Merman (Sewell, Lesson 6). Originally Porter had written the song for the Broadway show Star Dust which subsequently was not produced (Burlingame). Generally, book musicals would only run for a short period of time, if they even ran at all, they were soon forgotten. Nevertheless, over …show more content…
The lyrics read, “I get no kick from [by getting intoxicated] champagne (…) Some get a kick from [the use of drugs] cocaine (…) I get no kick in a plane [thrill seeking] (…) But I get a kick out of you” (Lyrics). As the song was incorporated into singers’ songbooks or another Broadway show, the verbiage was at times slightly changed. Likewise, Porter adjusted the lyrics to “I Get a Kick Out of You” to fit Ethel Merman’s style in her performance of the song for the musical Anything Goes (Burlingame). Other performers would change the entire genre of a song. Like Ella Fitzgerald did with her performance of “I Get a Kick Out of You.” Therefore, it is the purpose of this paper to compare the performance of “I Get a Kick Out of You” by the singer who first made the song a favorite standard, Ethel Merman from the musical Anything Goes, and the “First Lady of Song” Ella Fitzgerald who inducted it into one of her series of song books titled, Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Song Book in 1956 (Yanow; OnAmerican, Lesson …show more content…
While with Verve Records in 1956 she recorded, “a series of song books dedicated to American songwriters” (Sewell, Lesson 6). Fitzgerald was one of the most famous, influential female jazz singers. Thus, in her interpretation of “I Get a Kick Out of You,” she is backed by a quartet. One which was popular in that era would have included a guitar, piano and base drums, whereby creating a more intimate feel. Although, Fitzgerald comes from a church and gospel background in jazz, we’re not hearing any of the gospel influence on her interpretation of the song. Fitzgerald’s voice is darker. In her interpretation she often takes the liberty to hold back and then move a lyric ahead to suit her style. Moreover, because she’s playing with a small group they can easily adapt to maneuver with her. The intent of the sound itself is to be more intimate. Lending this sort of invitation to listen

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