Unsolved Murders In The 1920's

Superior Essays
Unsolved Murders in the 1920’s

During the 1920’s, also known as the “Roaring Twenties,” America was growing as a country; slowly but surely. It was an age of dramatic social, economic, and political change. America converted from Agricultural to Industrial. World War I, which lasted from 1914-1918, ended. New technological developments, writers, singers, jazz music, and economic growth also came out of the 1920’s. Numerous Americans moved from miniature farms to the substantial cities, but what people ignored where the vast amount of murders happening within these cities in the 1920’s. Plentiful murderous actions were seen and witnessed in the streets of America during 1920’s, but bare few were reported. The 1920’s was at a ideally dangerous
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The murderers in the 1920’s were actually sneaky and rarely acquired caught which is why murder rates increased dramatically during this time period. The murderers could easily just kill someone just by cause of they despised them or they owed plenty of money or they made assumptions and accused people who were innocent and disappear with a blink of an eye and no one would notice until they saw a dead body but by then ordinarily, it would have been too late. This was the case in “The Murder of Joseph Bowne Elwell.” Joseph Elwell was a New York City man who was well known throughout the U.S. He was a published author and a successful gambler but the gambling might have killed him. Police said “that the killer must have crouched in front of Elwell when he or she pulled the trigger.” Investigators figured out that Joseph was shot in the head with no signs of forced entry meaning that he knew his killer. What the investigators overlooked to allude is the murderer. After the scene, the murderer fled and was never discovered to this day. He lived a happy long life knowing that he took ones without any consequence. This is a perfect example of a murderer not getting caught in one of ultimate sinful conditions that one could do to another. Murders could easily acquire away with no consequence if they actually tried firm enough in the 1920’s …show more content…
One of the last conditions a citizen in American wants to worry about is safety since that’s the government's job, but that was not the case in the 1920’s. Police, Firefighters and copious more took years to arrive to the destination that called them. This benefited the murderer due to that it gave them the time to think about what they were actually doing and if they wanted to precede with the murder. Witnesses would call the police if they witnessed or heard something suspicious, but the police would take hours to come which made them genuinely unreliable. People believed that it was either a live or die situation and relied more on luck than on the Federal Department. In the Lady in the Ashes murder, Pappas and his wife had just arrived home from a party. Pappas was drunk and they endured in a enormous argument. A neighbor heard a loud shriek, loud shrieks so they took matters into their own hands and called the police, but by the time they arrived, Pappas had stabbed his wife several times and buried her in the basement. He was caught, but a life was lost due to the long wait of the Federal Department. Accordingly, The Case of the Ragged Stranger. A guy by the name of Carl Wanderer, who was a war veteran and was the son of two immigrants, went to the movies with his wife. On their way out of the movies, a shooter started shooting at them

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