Multiple Perspectives Of Scout And Scout

1014 Words 5 Pages
Thesis: Scout and Skeeter both go through major transformations as time progresses in light of the fact that they both grasp the importance of multiple perspectives to every story, become aware of the evils of discrimination against a race through another character, and To begin, Scout and Skeeter go through similar alterations because they both realize the significance of examining situations from various perspectives. For example, after a tough day at school, Scout is not happy with her teacher, Miss Caroline, and does not want to go back to school. Atticus, Scout’s father, explains to her that in order to understand someone, it is necessary to walk in their shoes and look at situations from their perspective, in this case Miss Caroline. …show more content…
Jem, Scout’s older brother, is not in a great mood after losing his pants at the Radley household, and Scout attempts to reason why, and does so by walking in his shoes, a lesson taught by her father. As it can be seen, Scout clearly transforms, because not too long ago she was only considering positions from only her point of view. Now, she takes a different approach, looking into things from Jem’s perspective, and she comes to realize, through his perspective, that she very likely may have been dead had she not been with her older brother. Similarly, Skeeter also tackles the importance of multiple perspectives to every story. Skeeter, having recently graduated from Ole Miss with her degree, is looking to become a writer. She contacts Elaine Stein, an editor for Harper & Row, Publishers, and explains to her how she was raised by a colored women and the relation between her family and …show more content…
Scout, for instance, is highly unaware of how blacks and whites interact in her community. Atticus had recently defended Tom Robinson, a man accused of raping a woman, Mayella Ewell, in court and his client was found guilty. Jem, who was confident that his father would win the case, is not happy with the court’s decision and he and his father chat about the justice system in their town of Maycomb, Alabama. Scout, listening to the conversation, overhears Atticus claim, “As you grow older, you 'll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you something and don 't you forget it - whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash” (Lee 295). Scout, very young of age, becomes aware of the corrupt practices that revolve around racial discrimination by learning yet another lesson from her father. Her father explains to her that white men, on a day-to-day basis, will always take advantage if black men, but those men, no matter their status, should be looked down upon. This lesson that Atticus gives to Scout shows how she is changing as she was once a girl unaware of how race impacted her community, but now she is beginning to fill up all of the blind spots,

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