Multiculturalism And Racism In Canada

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Multiculturalism exists when people accept and encourage many cultures to thrive in a society. Multiculturalism in Canada is the recognition that Canadians share equal rights and responsibilities. Canada is a place where people with diverse cultural backgrounds is entitled to practice their faith and traditions freely and take pride in their heritage. Some define Canada as a "cultural mosaic" which means a blend of multiple cultures in one society, organization or nation. . But, there are constant barriers that stops Canada from becoming a multicultural society. Canada is not a multicultural country as a result of racism, immigration and, lack of individualism.
Racism is an issue when it comes to multiculturalism in Canada. The idea of racism in Canadian society may seem impossible because it is hard to admit that your country is not as perfect as it appears and therefore you turn a blind eye when it actually occurs, but various studies have proven that racism social exists in interactions and institutions. The Canadian Charter of rights and freedom guarantees the rights and freedom of people in the society.
“Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin,
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Furthermore, understanding that there are more subtle forms of racism, less conscious and less easy to pinpoint but just as destructive in Canada will help Canada grow into a much more anti- sematic and diverse country who accepts all minorities and there difference and teaches each generation that it is okay to be

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