Reflection: Privilegent Bilingual Students

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After my time in CI 280, I learned copious amounts of vital information regarding English Language Learners (ELL) and their education. There were many important take-aways from the class, such as the importance of giving emergent bilingual students the best education possible. If I could remember anything from this class in three years from now it would be these following things. First, I would want to remember to understand the culture all of students in my class in order to relate to them on a personal level. Also, I want to celebrate each student’s culture without making them feel like an outcast. In my opinion, culture is very important and students should be able to express themselves. Inclusion is something that is very important to …show more content…
For example, priority is to help emergent bilinguals learn English, but I think it is also important to have other students learn their language, as well. Therefore, I am helping diversify all of my students. Furthermore, I would make sure I created a welcoming classroom for my students. When an emergent bilingual first enters an American classroom, they are not used to mainstream American culture. Typically, they do not understand the language, rules, routines, or expected behavior. It is the teacher’s job to make sure their students feel safe and welcome. It is important for teachers to understand the cultural accommodation stages, to help understand any unusual actions or reactions an emergent bilingual student may display when adjusting to their new classroom ("How to Create a Welcoming Classroom Environment", n.d.). The first stage to be aware of is euphoria, where the student is generally excited and eager to learn about new surroundings ("How to Create a Welcoming Classroom Environment", n.d.). Then, cultural shock might set in; where the student might be angry or resent their new culture ("How to Create a Welcoming Classroom Environment", n.d.). The next stage is acceptance, which happens once the student slowly starts to acknowledge their new environment ("How to Create a Welcoming Classroom Environment", n.d.). The final stage is assimilation/adaptation, which is when the emergent bilingual student embraces and accepts the new culture ("How to Create a Welcoming Classroom Environment", n.d.). Another aspect of creating a welcoming classroom is making a daily visual schedule ("How to Create a Welcoming Classroom Environment", n.d.). For example, I would create a multilingual Velcro board that I could change accordingly to account for our daily schedule. Also, like I stated before, inviting all cultures into the classroom is something I believe

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