Muhammad Ali: The Most Influential Person In The Civil Rights Movement

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Muhammad Ali was one of the most influential person in the Civil Rights Movement. He was very successful in most of what he did, including boxing. He took a stand in a lot of ways, but they were all on purpose. He did this because, as an African-American, white people were very rude to black people, only because of their color. Muhammad Ali was born in Louisville, Kentucky on January 17, 1942 with the name
Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. His parents were Odessa Grady Clay, his mother, and Cassius Clay Sr, his father. He was an African-American who lived in the times of segregation. Segregation was when America was very separated between blacks and whites. There were many specific schools, bathrooms, drinking fountains, and many other things for
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For example, he began an organization called “Main Bout Inc”. It was where he could, and did, give the majority of his money earned from defending championship titles to African-Americans. At the time, winning boxing title matches was considered the most profit-producing “prize” .
Eventually, in 1984, Muhammad Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Syndrome. The reason is likely being hit around a lot in boxing rings and being traumatized. He started to slow down, but continued to do good deeds around the world. One example is when he met with the Iraqi leader, Saddam Hussein, in 1990 to discuss terms about the liberation of American hostages. Another is he ventured to Afghanistan as a messenger of peace in 2002.
When Muhammad Ali died recently on June 3, 2016, the world was shocked.
In conclusion, Muhammad Ali helped with a lot of things to help African-Americans. A lot of his actions were for African-Americans, but towards whites. Since he was so famous in boxing, forming the Main Bout Inc was a smart idea because some people might ignore what he did and focus on boxing. But forming the organization made it where they would focus on

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