Mudsill Theory Of Slavery In The Early Years Of The United States

1304 Words 6 Pages
The United States of America proclaimed their independence to Great Britain and the world on July 4, 1776. Each year on that very day, millions of Americans celebrate the beloved day where we attained our independence to create our own country, but how we celebrate today is far different than many “citizens” did over a hundred years ago. In the early years of the United States, Black slaves did not go into Independence Day with enthusiasm, they were denied rights and controlled as property by people of the upper class, and denied voices in society. Black slaves were not allowed to vote, own property, or even live their lives freely and in the way they want. Black slaves were not even considered “people” in the eyes of many White folks, especially …show more content…
As a Southerner, Hammond believed that slavery was just and needed, allowing the United States economy to flourish. Hammond believed a lower, working class is needed in society who provide the basis for society, are not highly educated, allowing them to do the hard, tough jobs. This lower class needs and has a large amount determination and loyalty, along with a hard work ethic, enabling them to do their work to make the country great. Going off the work of the lower class, the higher, wealthy class provides civilization, order, law, it makes up the politicians and decision makers, and without the higher class, society would not be in order. According to Hammond, the South’s society consists of a higher class that is made up of White people, and they are the decision makers and are the controlling over society. In the South, the lower class is made up of Black slaves, who do all the hard labor, with no rights, they provide extremely cheap labor, and they can work in all climates and circumstances. Contrasting with the South, Hammond believed the workers in the North are essentially “slaves”, as they are hired workers, working for whatever they can get, making low wages, begging for money, and living with starvation. Hammond believed Black slaves in the South have better lives because they are hired …show more content…
As a Southern man with pro-slavery beliefs, James Hammond believes that Black slaves are needed for society. Though slavery is morally wrong, and all Southerners knew the harm they were giving to their slaves in their work, most Southerners, including Hammond, believed Black slaves were a necessity as they build the foundation for society. Providing the anti-slavery and the morally-correct insight to the debate was Abraham Lincoln, as he promoted that if people were paid for their services, they would put more effort into their jobs, and they can move up in society. This philosophy could also apply to Black slaves, where if they were freed and given the chance to create something more and better in their lives, they would soon take advantage of it, making the United States of America greater. Enforcing the trend that would later come, Abraham Lincoln expresses that if Blacks moved up in society as a result of their hard work and effort, the United States will be a stronger nation, and all people will have rights, defining the United States of America as a truly “free” country. Abraham Lincoln helped prove to the United States as a whole that slavery was morally wrong, just how Frederick Douglass’ words directly go against those of John C. Calhoun, putting the

Related Documents