Mountain Building And Sea Level Change

Improved Essays
For ONE of the mountain building episodes, describe the outcrop-scale evidence and the stratigraphic evidence that supports your interpretation. Also, please describe the relationship between mountain building and sea-level change. (You will need to consider additional outside research).

The transition between the Morrison and the Purgatoire formation was a mountain building event due to the fact that there was a drastic regional raise in sea level that corresponded to a dip in global sea level. This transition is a very evident unconformity due to the fact that between the end of the Jurassic and the beginning of the Cretaceous the sediment deposited has evidently seen drastically different depositional environments. This claim is supported
…show more content…
Which mountain building event does this correspond to on your sea level curve?

Compression was a driving force as evidenced by the curvature in the cross-section of sediment. Such force could occur at convergent boundary, which could be where two continental crusts collide or the subduction of oceanic crust below continental crust. When two continental crusts collide compression forces crust to displace both up and down. In a subduction zone when an oceanic plate falls below a continental plate compression aides to create volcanoes on the continental crust. In both cases the compression could have forced the sediment to begin to fold as the cross section shows.
This corresponds to the mountain building event marked by the contact between the Morrison and the Purgatoire formation. This transition was denoted as a mountain building event due to the fact that there was a drastic regional raise in sea level that corresponded to a dip in the global sea level. Flag this
…show more content…
This corresponds with a regression as the change in depositional environments marks a decrease in sea level over a short period of time. The transition from Hard Scrabble to Lower Fountain also represents a regression, but was likely caused by isostasy. Isostasy occurs when the elevation of Earth’s surface lowers in order to meet the level that the lithosphere naturally rests: this process would reduce the amount that the land was able to displace the regional sea level; therefore, decreasing the regional sea

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Bird tested this theory by using Computer modeling. In his simulation bird based the earth on the 'Jelly Sandwich ' theory which states that the earth 's crust is floating on a layer of partially molten upper mantle which is then underlain by a dense layer of mantle called mantle lithosphere. In Bird 's computer models he was able to adjust variables such as the strength of the lithosphere and the amount of friction generated between the two plates. After testing Bird concluded that even in simulations with relatively low amounts of friction the strain created was still great enough to deform the upper portion of the lithosphere by 5-10%. Which he believed would have been more than enough to create the Rock Mountains and explain its strange features (Bird,…

    • 929 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The coastal region is getting eroded but very slowly the sea levels are rising which makes it look like it is getting eroded, rocks are getting eroded under water and also above the water level by physical, biological and chemical .…

    • 619 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Brilliant Essays

    Trans Pecos Research Paper

    • 3033 Words
    • 13 Pages

    The Cretaceous was the starting point when the Laramide Orogeny began to fault and fold as a result of tectonic activity which pushed the Farallon plate into the North American plate forcing the subduction of the Farallon. This subduction caused the plate to melt and form magma that either formed laccoliths, or intruded country rock with different igneous compositions. These compositions ranged from alkaline to mafic to rhyolitic based on their interactions as they made their way to the surface with country rock. Mafic magma interacts well with host rock while rhyolitic magma does not due to its high viscosity.…

    • 3033 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Brilliant Essays
  • Great Essays

    Badlands Research Paper

    • 1447 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Chadron and Brule Formations were formed from the erosion of the Black Hills and Rocky Mountains due to the uplift from the Laramide Orogeny (Graham, 2008). As uplift occurs so does denudation to try and compensate for the uplift. The natural processes that shape the earth, such as uplift and erosion try to balance each other out. All of this sediment caused by the erosion of the Blacks and Rocky Mountains was carried east and…

    • 1447 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Besides the granite of which there is a plethora of, diorite and monzonite also formed as a result of the cooling of molten rock under the earth’s surface. These rock formations were the result of the natural geological process of subduction in which the Pacific Ocean plate is forced underneath the advancing North American Continental plate. Critically hot water from the subduction of the ocean floor, rose upwards about 75-100 kilometers and melted rocks in its path, creating the volcanic activity that gave rise to rock formations away from the subduction zone. The time at which all these process are dated to have taken place is during the Cretaceous…

    • 864 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Axial Seamount Essay

    • 466 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The purpose of this paper is the explain a natural phenomena, Axial Seamount. Even if the reader has no knowledge of Axial Seamount, they will be able to fully understand the content of this paper. They will learn facts about Axial Seamount such as what it is, on what plates it is located on, what landforms are around it, etc.…

    • 466 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mount St Helens

    • 985 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 was the worst recorded eruption and landslide in U.S. history. Multiple minor quakes and eruptions had lead up to the major eruption that will forever remain in the minds of those who experienced it. The mountain had been downsized and lots of land was destroyed, along with people’s comfortability with the mountain. The world will never look at Mt. Saint Helens the same way ever…

    • 985 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Antler Orogeny Model

    • 718 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The North American source of terrigenous sediments in allochthon are sound, whereas there is no persuasive reason to suggest accumulation only in the Paleozoic continental margin. The sediments of the Roberts mountains autochthon consist of calcareous strata of Cambrian through Devonian age; these rocks deposited on the shelf of the North American continent. In general, the Antler age deformation in the Roberts Mountains autochthon is almost absent, except some minor deformation seems to have been due to shear transmitted by a surface thrust rather than intracontinental…

    • 718 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The water level had ended up dropping to 280 to 350 feet below sea level. Once the water…

    • 245 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Hoffman, P., 1988, United plates of America, the birth of a craton: Early Proterozoic assembly and growth of Laurentia: Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters, v. 16, p. 543-603.…

    • 2081 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Another factor that contributed to the formation of the Grand Canyon includes change in climate. After the ice age began to recede about 2 million years ago, melting snow from the Rocky Mountains began to speed the excavation of the canyon. The climate was also producing a large amount of precipitation, which led to the increase in runoff and the significant erosion capabilities of the Colorado River. (Stanley)…

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Badlands Formation

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In order from oldest to youngest, they are the Pierre Shale, the Fox Hills Formation, the Chamberlain Pass, Chadron Formation, the Brule Formation, and the Sharps Formation. (McDonald 36) A sub category of these formations would be the White River Group, which consists of The Chamberlain Pass, Chadron, and Brule formation. (McDonald 36) Terrestrial sedimentation, which occurred during the Tertiary Era, is responsible for how the White River Group formed. The volcanoes mentioned above started the events that lead to the formation of the Western Interior Seaway, which covered what is now known as the great planes. As time passed, mud located on the sea floor hardened, an once all of the water was completely gone, the sea floor was exposed to air, and the exposed mud became a tropical soil. The Yellow Mounds today showcase this display this process. By around 50 million years ago, smaller remnants of the Western Interior Seaway had completely vanished from the region, replaced with a low plain. Then, he rolling gray hills of the Chadron formation were formed within a warm and humid environment. Large rivers carried a vast amount of sentiment from the Black Hills down to the Badlands, which was once a geological basin, or a low point. From 34-40 million years ago, climate went from a sub-tropical to cooler, drier air. During this time, river channels and windblown sentiments deposited the Bruele formation. Rivers also began to flood, leaving the sand, mud, and other elements too pile up, which led to a vast amount of fossils. The highest peaks in Badlands are what is known as the Sharpes Formation. This was formed from the rocky ford ash that came from a volcanic eruption to the west of Badlands. Sentiments that formed this were from ancient sea, rivers, flood plains, and windblown volcanic ash that was deposited 75-25 million years ago, which then formed the sedimentary rock layers seen today.…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Athabasca River Valley

    • 248 Words
    • 1 Pages

    Near the end of the Pleistocene Period, between 12,000 and 17,000 years ago, a massive landslide occurred within the upper reaches of the Athabasca River valley. As a result of this landslide, millions of tonnes of beige to pinkish quartzite and quartzitic conglomerate slid from the side of a mountain and onto the top of a valley glacier within the Athabasca River valley. On its top, the narrow valley glacier carried eastward this mass of Gog Group quartzite and quartzitic conglomerate. Because it lay on and within the top of this glacier, the highly fractured boulders were neither broken up into smaller blocks nor rounded by movement of the glaciers that transported it. After leaving the Rocky Mountains, the valley glacier collided with the…

    • 248 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Wilbern Formation

    • 461 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Each member of the Wilberns Formation boasts a different diagenetic history, due to this staggering complexity of the individual members that compose the Wilberns Formation; each member’s geologic history will be explored. The one common feature of the members of the Wilberns is that they were deposited from the middle Cambrian to the late Cambrian; however, depositional environments were varied throughout the depositional history of the Wilberns formation (Barnes and Bell, 1977). The Paleogeographic map of North America (fig. 5) from Blakely (2005) demonstrates that the Llano region of central Texas was submerged in a shallow sea, this map is an approximation, especially given that aeolian sedimentary phenomena, like calcrete (Read, in Walter, 1976, p. 56; Deso, 1998, p. 49), and desiccation cracks (Gann, 2000, p. 53) are foundsporadically at outcrop. These aeolian features are more than likely features of a subaerially exposed shoal or tidal flat during short-lived, local eustatic periods. The controlling factor during the deposition of the Wilberns formation, and for all of Texas and North America during the middle to late Cambrian is the Sauk Sequence…

    • 461 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Rise Of Sea Level

    • 1739 Words
    • 7 Pages

    “The thermal expansion of the world’s water bodies and the melting of glaciers is a slow, but pernicious process.”(Leatherman, Kershaw, Patricia, 2002) Sea level is rising at an approximate rate of 2 mm/year (Douglas et al., 2001) and is expected to accelerate over the next 100 years (USGCRP, 2001). In the next 100 years, the rate of the sea level rise is expected to increase by 0.44 (8cm/18cm) to 4.9(88cm/18cm) (IPCC, 2001). Even scientists are not able to reach agreement on this point which the rate of rise will be accelerated; it is unquestionable that the sea level is…

    • 1739 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays

Related Topics