Taylor In The Bean Trees

Improved Essays
In the novel The Bean Trees, by Barbara Kingsolver, the main protagonist, Taylor, realizes the existence of kindness among strangers she has met in bitter society by finding her family in Tucson. Furthermore, she has acquired maternal qualities through taking care of her daughter Turtle and also through the influence of how others have treated her with friendliness. The novel begins with Taylor determining to move out from her hometown in Kentucky after realizing most of the young women around her age becomes pregnant in the end, which describes her initial character that does not regard friendly relations between strangers. Taylor then meets her daughter, Turtle, and shows images of unskilled mother that demonstrates her effort to act motherly …show more content…
When Taylor first received Turtle from an Indian woman, she exemplifies her image of an unskilled mother by not knowing how to take care of Turtle. However, currently, Taylor shows the frustration of herself that she did not provide Turtle with enough safety and claims that she is not a worthy mother. She further describes Turtle’s eyes have returned back to the fearful looks that she first saw when Turtle and she first met. The frustration of Taylor implies Taylor have tried to improve Turtle’s ill mental condition by acting as a protective mother. Taylor’s maternal qualities are further characterizes when Lou Ann describes Taylor that she is not like what she used to be when they first met. Lou Ann’s description implies that Taylor has developed into more maternal parent from a skeptical young woman. Taylor’s change of personality characterizes the peak of maternal qualities of her and portrays the developed herself from the …show more content…
Taylor has gone through many incidents since she left from Kentucky where she did not consider any friendly relationship between strangers. She came to realize the importance of families when she received help from Esteban and Esperanza in the process of issuing a legal document for Turtle’s custody. However, she also helped them to settle down in Oklahoma and protected them from being deported. Based on this symbiotic relation between them, Taylor learns that they are a family and Tucson is their home. Furthermore, Taylor explicitly claims that Tucson is her and Turtle’s home, which describes that Taylor’s view and personality have changed to view the family as a crucial factor of her life. By acknowledging Tucson as her home and gaining the custody of Turtle, Taylor changes her personality and realizes that families exist to help its member’s

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    As Violet changes, Alice also releases some of the hurt from her failed marriage as well and mourns over her adopted child. Retrospectively, she realizes her strictness of Dorcas possibly led to Dorcas’s desire to belong by whatever means necessary. Even though Alice loses Dorcas before their healing relationship, Alice gains more insights on motherhood because of her communal relationship with Violet. Both of the two women…

    • 1566 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    I’m not a genius!” (45). Then there is a second conflict which is person vs. self. As Jing Mei’s mother wants her daughter to be prodigy, Jing Mei starts getting frustrated with herself. The author states that “After seeing my mother’s…

    • 1325 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    She was expected to be a mother, wife, and housekeeper. Motherhood was one thing she struggled with throughout the novel, as she awakened and realized that she was not made to be a “mother-woman”. In the novel Edna states, “The children appeared before her like antagonists who had overcome her, who had overpowered and sought to drag her into the soul’s slavery for the rest of her days. But she knew a way to elude them” (Chopin, 124). Edna eventually realized through her awakening that she was not made to be a mother and her children only hindered her from being her true self.…

    • 943 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Some of the mothers left notes to Fessler due to the shame of their previous pregnancy. The stories reflected the trouble of the mothers and the misunderstanding they receive about their emotions and how society still judge their feelings after following the social norm. Additionally, as the problem might be centered on the mother, this chapter showed how other relatives and siblings are also affected by adoption. On the other hand, some women were able to distract themselves by working and accomplishing a high status. However, the most important action that can heal a mother who relinquished her child is talk and see her children.…

    • 2020 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Leeann Family Case Study

    • 1023 Words
    • 4 Pages

    It appears that in LeeAnn’s family, an enmeshed boundary may be present between Kris, the 10-year-old daughter and the mother. An illustration of this boundary dynamic is that the mother uses Kris as a “confidant”, where she is being told intimate information. The enmeshment between them has weakened the boundaries. Enmeshment is also examined here because Kris has set aside personal autonomy and personal obligations of school and friendships to succumb to the needs of the relationship between her and her mother. Of course, as stated, defining the family dynamics with only one dynamic descriptor is challenging.…

    • 1023 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The first seeds of wrong perception of herself are, for instance, caused by her mother Pauline Breedlove, who herself was infected by foisted standards of women beauty, which was undoubtedly caused by watching movies that changed her values and this resulted in her behavior towards her children, in other words, she rejected them. The failure of Pauline as a mother is shown, when Pecola calls her mother “Mrs. Breedlove”, thing that gives us a certain view of the mother’s emotional distance from her daughter. Her father Cholly also is not capable of bringing stability and love to his family. The reason could be his own unhappy childhood, when his father was unknown and his own mother abandoned him at the age of four.…

    • 1517 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Just as the voice of the mother in “Girl” resents and worries about her daughter becoming a woman, Kincaid’s mother seemed to become more oppressive and bitter toward Kincaid as she grew older” (Sparknotes). The mother simply wanted her daughter to know how a woman should act, do, and while doing so, gain…

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The need to feel accepted in the world drives human beings to conform to what seems acceptable ultimately jeopardizing their true self. Kate Chopin’s “Story of an Hour”, and Tillie Olsen’s “I Stand Here Ironing”, both depict women conforming to society’s ideals. Both women fall into the trap of following what people believe is the norm. Chopin’s “Story of an Hour” is about a young woman who feels incarcerated in her marriage and when hearing news of her husbands “death” she feels joyful. In Olsen’s “I Stand Here Ironing” the mother feels partially responsible of how her daughter’s life turned out due to the lacking of attention she needed.…

    • 1160 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Through Sister 's point of view the reader is directly spoken to and consequently influenced by Sister 's personal views. Eudora Welty did this in order for the readers to sympathize with Sister as her family turns against her and she tells the story of events leading up to her living in the town of China Grove 's Post Office. The story opens with Sister as she unquestionably sets herself up to be an unreliable narrator based on her own bias and feeling of bias that she believes her family holds against her. "I was getting along fine with Mama, Papa-Daddy, and Uncle Rondo until my sister Stella-Rondo just separated from her husband and came back home again." (41) Sister blatantly blames her sister, Stella Rondo, for her own unhappiness along with her family discourse and the loss of the man she once loved.…

    • 715 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Edna's Awakening Analysis

    • 720 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In Part two of the novel Edna’s awakening is beginning to make her become cancerous and destructive to herself and her family. Edna’s appearance and role as a mother seems to be very short lived. The nanny in the story begins to take on the role of being the main care taker of Edna’s children. Edna becomes more conscious of the fact that she is begging to fall in love with Robert. But is suddenly struck with the truth of Robert’s abrupt decision to leave for Mexico.…

    • 720 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays