Most Influential Baseball Player: Babe Ruth

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Babe Ruth was one of the most influential players in baseball history. There are many reasons this is true. He was a player during the time where there were many scandals going on in the game and that truly hurt the game and that fan base. He was able to bring fans back to the game with his style, performance, passion, and character. He was an instantly likeable player that was able to draw fans into a game they had lost faith in. A game that had taken advantage of them and made them feel betrayed. By Ruth's ability to do this, he was the most influential player in baseball. To understand the influence Ruth had in the game, one must first look at his past. He was born in Baltimore in 1895 and was a troubled child. He was sent off to St. Mary's …show more content…
He soon caught the eye of the Boston Red Sox and was traded to them. He started his career at the Red Sox as a pitcher. However, when the managers saw how good of a batter he was, he was moved to the outfield so he would have the opportunity to bat more and have a bigger and better impact for the team. Even though Ruth was such an important part of the team and such a good batter, the owner of the Red Sox, Harry Frazee, sold him to the Yankees so he could fuel his performing aspirations. 1920 was Ruth's first season with the Yankees. It was with this team, that Ruth was able to become the legend his is remembered …show more content…
He also kept competition alive within the team because he was so good that it kept others doing their best. When Ruth was not on the field, he could be seen in ads in newspapers or heard in ads on the radio. He was able to spark the love of the game back into the heart of America after the 1919 World Series scandal, making him even more popular than some would think. His hitting and pitching records showed how impressive of a player he was. When comparing his records to those of today's players, his still seem more impressive because the game was so different from today. It was harder to make as big of an impact as he did. His presence made anything popular and that is why he is the most influential person baseball will ever

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