More Important Than Gold: Rhetorical Analysis Of Franklin D. Roosevelt

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Rhetorical Analysis of “More Important Than Gold” “More Important Than Gold” is the first fireside chat given by Franklin D. Roosevelt, and also the Top 100 Speeches of the 20th century in America. Fireside chats is the term used to describe a series of thirty evening radio addresses given by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt between 1933 and 1944(“Fireside chats”). It is a much kinder way to chat with the whole American and declare some political decision as well. The speaker, Franklin D. Roosevelt, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the President of the United States from 1933 to 1945 (“Franklin D. Roosevelt). America suffered a great economic depression during 1929 to 1931, which has brought enormous …show more content…
He believed in the power of government and introduced a series of policies to help to recover American economy, for which Roosevelt won many American’s respect. First fireside chat was given under the background of the banking crisis, and America’s economy was facing a great challenge. Roosevelt wanted to improve people’s confidence to American government and get the people together to suffer this crisis. There is no denying that this fireside chat got a great result and played a sufficient role in recovering economy. Furthermore, a lot of persuasive techniques such as ethos, pathos and logos are applied nicely in the speech, figurative language is used widely as well. All of these rhetorical strategies contributes to organize the speech and encourage the audience to be brave and courageous. This essay will attempt to analyze the rhetorical …show more content…
At the beginning of the speech, President Roosevelt said that, “My friends, I want to talk for a few minutes with the people of the United States about banking.” Then he pointed out that, “I want to tell you what has been done in the last few days, and why it was done, and what the next steps are going to be.” These sentences use ethos to clearly claim what the speaker was going to talk next, and show speaker’s kind character at the meantime. Roosevelt began the nighttime chats with the greeting “My friends,” and referred to himself as “I” and the American people as “you” as if addressing his listeners directly and personally (“The First Fireside Chats”). The rhetorical device ethos used here also decreased the distance between the president and common people, and leads to achieve the purpose of the speech. Roosevelt wanted to release the bank panic and call on the whole people get united to suffer the crisis together. The friendly start of the address made audience relaxed and warm, which helped to decrease the public panic. Moreover, in the middle of the address, President Roosevelt showed his credibility and kind again by promising the public that money would be safe in the bank, and they would succeed finally. “I can assure you, my friends, that it is safer to keep your money in a reopened bank than it is to keep it under the mattress.” He also

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