Morality In Huckleberry Finn

Decent Essays
As time progresses, humanity has inadvertently risen to a level of hypocrisy ultimately leading to the censure of its customs. The concept of morals, in which society prides itself upon, becomes skewed as personal afflictions and sentiments begin to cloud one’s judgment predicting the dissolution of one’s innate reticence. Mark Twain examines this societal failing in his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Employing satire to scrutinize the ethics of man, Twain, in describing the momentous expedition of Huck and Jim, delineates the brutality of human nature through the portrayal of unprovoked spiteful acts executed out of individual pleasure, societal influence, or enduring disputes. Twain exploits the perversion of humanity through …show more content…
Society, in Twain’s opinion, essentially dictates where morals are applicable, and slavery was an exception. Even Huck, a character who doesn’t seemed to be daunted by laws, contemplates assisting Jim’s escape for he fears the repercussions that would entail. Jim’s situation establishes controversy in several characters’ lives including his owner, Miss Watson. According to Tom, she said, “She was ashamed she ever was going to sell him down the river, and said so; and she set him free in her will”. (290). During the novel’s time, slaves were seldom freed for it was thought that African Americans were ill-equipped to survive out of the supervision of whites. Miss Watson’s inability to emancipate Jim during her lifetime acknowledges that, despite her contrite thoughts, she could not bear to divert from social routine in fear of the effects on her reputation. Even after Jim was deemed a “good nigger” by the doctor for saving Tom’s life, “They came out and locked him up. I hoped they was going to say he could have one or two of the chains took off, because they was rotten heavy, or could have meat and greens with his bread and water; but they didn’t think of it, and I reckoned it wasn’t best for me to mix in” (291). Regardless of his valiant deed, Jim was still treated with the same cruelty as before exhibiting the imperious influence of slavery on man. Lastly, Twain once again demonstrates that …show more content…
When Huck inquires about the origin of the feud, Buck replies with, “Well I should reckon! It started thirty year ago, or som’ers along there. There was trouble ‘bout something, and then a lawsuit to settle it; and the suit when agin one of the men, and so he up and shot the man that won the suit-which he would naturally do, of course. Anybody would” (108). The ambiguous description of the reason behind the feud, and its duration, exposes the true absurdity of the entire situation. Essentially, the families are quarrelling over nothing but a vague memory and the assertion of dominance. By integrating this into his novel, Twain asserts that the tenacity of man inhibits resolution ultimately fostering otherwise unneeded barbarity. Despite societal emphasis on morals, mankind has coincidentally, without recollection of doing so, embraced disheartening qualities. Twain, in his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, exploits these social flaws threw his distinct presentation of characters. By satirizing these otherwise overlooked blemishes, Twain manages to illustrate the brutality of man. However, instead of insulting his audience, he entertains them. By subtly incorporating his personal views into his text, Mark Twain leaves a lasting impact on society that, as seen through the elements employed in his book,

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