Lucrece's Message Of The Virtuous In Shakespeare

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Shakespeare conveys his message of the virtuous in the world being trampled by the evil that subsists through his use of personification and other literary devices. In lines 25-28 Shakespeare likens Lucrece to beauty and honor with the words “Against the golden splendour of the sun; Anexpir’d date, cancell’d ere well begun: Honour and beauty, in the owner’s arms, Are weakly fortress’d from a world of harms” (Shakespeare, 25-28). Lucrece’s morally upright character shone in the light of the sun since she only gave of herself exclusively to her husband; when the night fell however, evil stained the clean soul that Lucrece possesses. Forts can hide purity away from the world, but they can also entrap it as stated by the McAllisters: “Lucrece …show more content…
Originally, Tarquin did not want to partake in the crime he committed, but he dismissed any thoughts of morality when he told himself “Hateful it is; there is no hate in loving” (Shakespeare, 240). Like so many other human beings Tarquin found a loophole for what he did so that he would not feel guilty about the crime he committed, giving evil the victory. Not only does Tarquin try to justify his actions, but he flat out refuses to take responsibility by blaming what he did on Lucrece’s beauty as J Hart observes “The actual rape shows Tarquin trying to narrativize this brutal action and to displace the responsibility and guilt for it on to Lucrece (477-672)” (Hart). Tarquin, like most people was not proud of himself when the reality of what he had done set in, and whatever good that was left in him disappeared as he blamed his actions on the magnificent beauty of …show more content…
Shakespeare points out near the beginning of the story that Beauty can overtake a man’s will and blind in his pursuing it, him by writing “Beauty itself doth of itself persuade, the eyes of men without an orator” (Shakespeare 29-31). Silently, beauty calls to a man, and makes him set aside all cares about morality in his efforts to obtain that beauty for himself. Tarquin may have been ensnared by Lucrece’s love, but Lucrece herself does not return the feeling which is captured in the analysis of Anthony Julius who writes: “Partly because love is not amenable to reason, and partly because the lover wishes his beloved to respond to him with the same unconditional, unpondered commitment as he himself shows, love” (Julius). Not only are men ensnared by this beauty but they foolishly expect this love back from the person they love, leading to hasty decisions as he blindly pursues what he thinks is his. Now in addition to looking at how morality can be disregarded in the pursuit of love, Shakespeare point out how a deeply engrained moral code can halt a person’s decisions through the thoughts of Tarquin: “What win I if I gain the thing I seek? A dream, a breath, a froth of fleeting joy. Who buys a minute’s mirth to wail a

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