Morality In Looking For Alaska, By John Green

1045 Words 5 Pages
Chapter 2: Nice to Eat with You: Acts of Communion According to Foster, the addition of shared meals in literature serves to create a bond between the characters and to demonstrate their relationships. Additionally, he notes the function of these symbolic meals shares little difference to the ritual of sharing substances such as drugs or alcohol. In Looking for Alaska by John Green, the main character meets his first friends on school move-in day when they invite him to smoke cigarettes by the lake. The shared experience, combined with the emotions of breaking rules together, establishes an immediate friendship between Pudge, the Colonel, and Alaska. Illegal communion acts, such as underage smoking on school grounds, further cements the …show more content…
The older figure represents traditional, corrupt values while the younger one demonstrates innocence and vulnerability. The idea of virtually stealing a life force in some concept remains a common goal for vampire-esque characters. In the Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children series by Ransom Riggs, a radical group of peculiar adults, the Wights, attempt to use the time control powers of the Ymbrynes to conquer the worlds. The plan is jumpstarted by a Wight disguised as the psychiatrist, Dr. Golan, to the main character, Jacob Portman. The doctor takes advantage of the teenager's emotional state after watching his grandfather's murder and pushes Jacob to solve his grandpa's last words. This puzzle eventually leads Jacob to a time loop in Wales. The Wight follows him there to begin the plan of capturing the time controlling Ymbrynes. The crookedness of taking advantage of Jacob and using him to advance an evil plan reminds readers of the exploitative and selfish interests of literary vampires. Furthermore, the Wights intend to literally use the Ymbrynes life force for their personal and physical gain, an additional reminder of the more common supernatural …show more content…
Montag from Fahrenheit 451 goes through such an experience of "being alive all over again". After Beatty attempts to arrest him for keeping books in his now incinerated home, Montag escapes custody by means of a flamethrower. As he runs from the Mechanical Hound, he departs toward the nearby river. Bradbury creates a racing and anticipatory mood before introducing the river with the shift in his tone to calm and peaceful. This change establishes the impact the river will create in Montag's life. The ex-fireman describes the experience of floating in the river as "moving from an unreality that was frightening into a reality that was unreal because it was new" (133). The author therein establishes the new and enjoyable life Montag will soon lead on the other side of the river, of his symbolic baptism. This new reality further cements itself after Montag discovers the group of societal outsiders and watches his own "death" on the portable viewer. After the government kills the random walking man representing the fugitive, Granger tells Montag, "Welcome back from the dead" (143), clearly demonstrating his baptism by means of escaping in the river and gaining the opportunity to lead a life he actually wants. He, quite literally, becomes a new person through this symbolic

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