Morality In Hobbes's Leviathan

759 Words 4 Pages
At the end of the ensanguined English Civil War, Hobbes wrote his book Leviathan, published in 1651. As he was witnessing the excessive violence and cruelty in his surroundings, he was made aware of the brutality that humans are capable of and developed a pessimistic view of the world. This translated into his belief that the State of Nature is a state of war where every person is against each other (80). Hobbes insists that such a condition results in a life of destitute because of the severe lack of morality and constant fear experienced by the members. Due to the terror-filled mode of being people are consistently in, no one is actually free. Their behaviour becomes uncontrollable, prohibiting amenities such as industries, navigation, transportation, …show more content…
Although some may be physically or mentally stronger than others, all are capable of murdering one another; humans are created as equals. There is no point in making agreements with neighbors because not only are people`s words subjective to their current emotional state but it is not in anyone’s best interest to keep the accords or remain honest (84). He discusses the Right of Nature, which is essentially the right to do whatever one deems as an acceptable act committed in order to survive (79). The problem is that virtually anything can be labeled as fundamental for one 's protection. Because of this, it has the potential to become a right to unethical acts. However, the Law of Nature, which Hobbes believed to be revealed by God through human’s ability for extensive reasoning, condemns the destruction of human life while simultaneously affirming human self-preservation (80). It contains nineteen parts which revolve around seeking peace though justice and morality, as well as doing unto others as one would want to be done upon oneself (97). This is the same reasoning, along with the longing to escape perpetual fear, which drives people to form a social …show more content…
The only way of successfully escaping this intolerable state is through a sovereign that will protect the people from themselves. Hobbes was for absolute monarchy which controls the people rather than represents them. Many people would be interested in it because they know it would be beneficial to them as it would put an end to the hostility between people (Stanford). Inaugurating commonwealth and justice by punishing those that try to injure others would allow people to have real liberty. Although fear and power remain present, the people are free because they have given the government permission to use these as tools for the maintenance of order and justice, as well as the prevention of the state of war. As long as the king protects the people who consented to obeying and satisfies his duties, the way by which it came to power is not important and the people have no right to revolution. They cannot overthrow the government or try to change

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