Morality In Anton Chekhov's The Lady With The Dog

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Morality in Shades
Colour is in the art and the art is literature. Often, one depicts morality the concept of shades: a color scheme that involves the gradation from lightest to darkest, which in most case, is white to black. In such scale, the shades white and black represent two contrasting extremes as they parallel the idea of morality, where white is right and black is wrong. However, the complication arises at the area between the white and black: the grey. The grey area possesses no absolute verdict, for one can be both morally right and wrong. Russian realist Anton Chekhov implements such perception as he colours the story with white, black, and grey. An exploration of “The Lady with The Dog” serves to examine his employment of colour in addressing the issue of morality, specifically regarding the characters’ actions, and in part, the conveyance of his personal views of what is right and wrong.
Although each individual will claim to retain a unique perception of what is right, most can share the agreement that the colour
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Although the concept of morality in shades should not particularly be alien to the reader, Chekhov does provide an interesting take of morality – for instance, that he believes love, or feelings, to be an important factor of human morale – which he expresses using the colours white, black, and grey. However, the reader should not expect to learn about morals through this story, as everyone possesses his or her own opinion, but rather should reconsider what they value is right and wrong. The exploration of colour in “The Lady with The Dog” proves insightful in understanding the author’s perspective towards morale of actions, even though Chekhov does not entertain the reader with an absolute verdict. Colour is in the art and the art is literature; and what this exploration reveals is only just one shade of the

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