Morality And Beliefs In The World Of Mahatma Gandhi

Decent Essays
In the world of ahimsa, nothing is allowed to compromise the ideology that is peace. From ways of warfare, both brutal and secretive to guns and weapons of mass terror, the world of Ahimsa is built upon a premise to out shadow with visions of compassion and relaxation. Ahimsa is the perception of non-violence that is carried through one 's deeds, words, and thoughts. One such example is a man who humbled himself in that such idea- Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi 's life and thought was a continuing process of evolution, an empirical testing and correcting as he translated his thoughts into action through his premise often known as experimental truth; that is, learning what 's around you through trial and error. Gandhi insisted on the harmony and unity …show more content…
Satya is a Sanskrit word that means to have truth in everything you do through actions, words, and deeds. This spiritual teaching is the cornerstone for a good way to live life, not just for Hindu’s for all beings. The premise is to connect with God, and thus morality and spirituality become intertwined and purified- present in Gandhi’s day-to-day ideology and spirituality. What this teaches us is that we must say 'Yes ' only when we mean 'Yes, ' and 'No ' when we mean 'No, ' regardless of consequences or personal bias. To understand this fully, we often overlook to Gandhi’s life experiences for guidance. It is often said that Mahatma Gandhi, a man who humbled himself in the concept of ahimsa and who believed deeply in Brahman and the idea of becoming 100% truthful to fully and deeply connect with God in a different way wrote a book entitled The Story of my Experiences with Truth. “He never bragged about having obtained a full truthful life” analysis Antonio de Nicola said. “nor did he brag about his ability to grasp the idea of satya. No no- he argued that he had the ability to merely explore it.” So if the principle idea of kindling a 100% truthful life in a 100% non-violent world isn’t fully possible, then how can exploring it aid in the quest to attain a spiritual connection with God? The answer lies in the connection itself- not the connection between one’s self and God, but the connection and relationship …show more content…
He said, “Ahimsa is the basis of the search of truth. The search is in vain unless it is founded on ahimsa as the basis. The only means for the realization of the Truth is ahimsa. A perfect vision of Truth can only follow a realization of ahimsa.” Ahimsa requires the idea of truthfulness and fearlessness as key generators for the basis of this such search. Gandhi adds, “There is only one whom we have to fear, that is God. When we fear God, we shall fear no man; and if you want to follow the vow of Truth, then fearlessness is absolutely necessary.” In other words, the spiritual progression between awareness to devotion only occurs through this chronological series of revelations and events: one first accepts the ideas of ahimsa and satya. One then applies these such lessons to one’s life and devotes themselves to its tasks at hand. Finally, one is greeted with the rollercoaster of searching and exploring different events and experiences hoping to end one day proud and happy. We can often refer to the example of a school. In school children are introduced to many different challenges- good and bad. It is up to the child to decide how he/she reacts to such challenges. But Gandhi never used the word react, instead- Gandhi would be the hypothetical child who never focused on the challenges, but merely took what he believed in and

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