Moralistic Themes In Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol

773 Words 4 Pages
Register to read the introduction… The fact that several moralistic themes can be applied throughout the novel confirms why it is a …show more content…
In the Present, Scrooge listens as Mrs. Cratchit abruptly denounces him after her husband denominated him Founder of the Feast. She indicates that Scrooge is, “an odius, stingy, hard, unfeeling man” (53). Later in the Present, the spirit warns Scrooge to beware of Ignorance and Want, vices symbolized by a boy and girl, whose appearances were wretched and extremely depressing. When Scrooge eagerly alluded the poor children should have shelter and protection, the spirit simply replied, “Are there no prisons?...Are there no workhouses?” (64). In relation to the beginning of the novel, these words have a great impact because even during the holiday season, Scrooge refused to donate money exclusively for nourishment and warmth to the less fortunate, but rather he chose to support establishments such as prisons and workhouses where he hoped the poor would reside. In the Future, he listens in disgust as people he was familiar with mock him after his …show more content…
In a scene of the Present, Scrooge is taken by the spirit to a game where the contestants must figure out an answer based on the description provided by Fred. Fred describes the answer subject, who is later revealed to be Scrooge himself, as “a savage animal...that growled and grunted...and lived in London” (61). Scrooge’s nephew ridiculed him and the group laughed at his expense; but Fred follows the laughter with a toast to his uncle’s health. This gesture of commendation for someone so unpleasant helped Scrooge realize how forgiving people can be, and to many people, he owes genuine repentance. In the presence of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, Scrooge pledges that he sincerely hopes to change his ways. The trembling of the spirit’s hand at the conclusion of Stave Four suggests that there truly is a chance for Scrooge to overthrow the prophecy he was just presented, and confidently he promises to “live in the Past, Present, and the Future,” and, “the Spirits of all Three shall strive within me” (79). Because he has been granted the opportunity to see what his real priorities should be, Scrooge righteously transforms – this is the second significant alteration of Scrooge’s character. Scrooge attends Bob Cratchit’s home, wishes him a merry Christmas, informs him that his salary will be raised, and sits down with the Cratchits to eat the dinner

Related Documents