Moralism In Plato's Allegory

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Plato’s Allegory In Plato’s allegory there are many major concepts of knowledge and how new knowledge can alter a person’s entire life. One of Plato’s points is that people will cling to what they have always been told when presented new knowledge and may terrify them. Plato says: “….you must not wonder that those who attain to this beatific vision are unwilling to descend to human affairs; for their souls are ever former state he had seen the shadows…..that what he saw before was an illusion…Will he not fancy the shadows?”. Another point Plato made is that the truth, more times than not, is painful. Plato says: “And if he is compelled to look straight at the light, will he not have a pain in his eyes which will make him turn away...” …show more content…
The man, when brought to the light was pained because, he released that ever thing he knew was a lie. The shadows that he and the other prisoners had named were wrong when compared to the ones already in the light, which, he is now required to adapt to the ways that contest his old ideas to live and be accepted in this new life. This shocking revelation pains him and wishes to return to the shadows. Students are faced with this when they learn that they are not as adapt in their abilities as they once thought. People who think that they are entitled to high grades but, don’t do assignments or only do the bare minimum are hastily reminded that this is a higher place of learning and receive lower grades. These entitled students will be quick to drop the class to replace it with a class that’s easier or drop out to return to the “shadows”. To whom that does accepts the new conflicting information will either be happier because they are now less ignorant than their former selves or sink in disappear now that they feel that they have been lied to their whole life. As Socrates talks to Glaucon, in Plato’s allegory, Socrates suggest that if this man would try to inform the other prisoners about the life outside the cave they would call the man a …show more content…
If a student who learns something new and tries to tell others they will criticizes the student and the information because it is foreign and different. In conclusion in Plato’s allegory there are many major concepts of knowledge and how new knowledge can alter a person’s entire life. One of Plato’s points is that people will cling to what they have always been told when presented new knowledge and may terrify them. Another point Plato made is that the truth, more times than not, is painful. Plato also makes the point that sometimes knowing the truth and trying to break people who stay firm to their old beliefs may be strenuous and will be cast out. These points can be seen in students life’s as they grow in

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