Moralism And John Stuart Mill's Theory Of Consequentialism

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It follows then that an individual’s actions are counted as being moral or immoral by how useful those actions are to the majority of people. There is no law or universal rule that trumps the fact that a larger quantity of people are seen as more useful than a smaller quantity from a utilitarian perspective. Similarly, John Stuart Mill would justify his recommendation to Jim in accordance to the theory of consequentialism or determining whether an action is right or wrong by analyzing the consequence it produces. If the act performed benefits a large group of people, the many instead of the few, then it is considered to be right or moral. On these premises Mill could then assure Jim that his actions were moral because more lives were being …show more content…
Kant believed that morality was based on “pure reason”, and that individuals should act morally regardless of the consequences.(Kant) Rather than focus on the consequences of an action like John Stuart Mill, Emmanuel Kant focused on the action’s type according to the individual’s duties, obligations, and responsibilities to others. Kant would justify his recommendation by saying that Jim is obligated to do what is right according to his deontological theory no matter what the outcome, or consequence will be. Jim is duty bound to save the life of the man who is innocent instead of choosing to save the lives of the other men and himself according to a deontological perspective. Jim, thusly cannot justify deciding to reject his duties and responsibilities in favor of a more desirable …show more content…
Kant essentially states that to act in favor of the majority or in favor of yourself instead of following a universal rule or law is wrong. Because of this Kant’s Categorical Imperatives by their very nature reject the theories of John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism. If in Jim’s situation he were to choose to kill the man and save himself or the others, he would be seen as using the innocent as a mean to an end, an immoral act according to Kant. To be aligned with these Categorical Imperatives was to live

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