Why Should We Be Moral?

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From the beginning of the semester, every student in this course, including myself was required to write a paper about what is the whole Philosophy concept mean and as regards the questions being asked such as “what is ethics?”, “what is the good?”, and “why should we be moral?”. In the meanwhile, before the class started to explore more depth about the meaning of those questions, Ethics defined what we as a human being believe in what is the rightness or the wrongness. Moral is what teaches us in our beliefs on the rightness or the wrongness. Every human in different culture should have different morals; some may have good morals and bad morals for example, bad reputation. Yet, why should we be moral? Being a moral is acting out and treat …show more content…
Because it’s a indicate of life within life to be someone who doesn 't depend on their nonsense instinct such as a sexual pleasure. If both male and female must need the sex, some people may say it can be wrong to seduce someone only for getting the pleasure. They have the potential to postpone pleasure and if you cannot wait, then that is the weakest because postponing pleasure is part of our reasoning potential. Without moral, won’t leave the things you are expected to do. Do what is right and good. However, discovering what the rightness and goodness requires reading and predicting a situation. Your responsible is for what you can do. This paragraph will be examined the different ethical concepts and principles and how it will be related to reality. The first thing will be discussed is relativism, this ethical concept defines the moral rightness and wrongness of actions that vary from society to society and also there is no universal moral standards. Comparing the different culture, we all distinguish that there are no universal consensus about which or what behavior are good and bad. Within cultures, People support their own society’s way of behaving and dismissing the conflict ways of behaving in another cultural world. Therefore each human …show more content…
Next, utilitarianism is another ethical concept that will be examining. Utilitarianism, one of the well known and influential theory, defined as the best action leads to the greatest happiness for the greatest numbers. There are two categories in Utilitarianism, an Act-Utilitarianism and Rule-Utilitarianism. Act-Utilitarianism is the effects of individual actions while Rule-Utilitarianism only focus on the types of actions. The purpose of utilitarians is to make a better life by enlarging the amount of good pleasure and happiness and also reducing the amount of bad pain and unhappiness. Bentham was a Act-Utilitarian and Mill was an Rule-Utilitarian. Bentham’s one principle is to maximize pleasure and minimize pain. We point out what we ought to do as well as what we shall do. An act is right if we bring more pleasure than pain and an act is wrong if we bring more pain than

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