Morality In Huckleberry Finn Essay

Better Essays
Joe Carney
Mr. Ringuette
Section 222
19 May 2017
Morals know no intellect Slavery is the biggest damnation to ever take place on American soil and the only show of slavery that discriminated based upon race instead of social class. This is the biggest moral topic examined in the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Huck Finn is a boy from the American revolutionary times who is very mischievous and uncivilized, but with one unique characteristic; outstanding morals. He gets his best traits by nature because we see in the novel that society is persuading Huck to hate blacks and become”sivilized”. Huck understands that if becoming racist is part of being “sivilized” then he isn't having anything to do with it. So for
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Having that said, Huck is still shocked to see Jim show true love towards him and believed Jim was a black man with a white man’s soul. We see Huck immediately tested by Jim's presents as they meet on the island, "But mind, you said you wouldn' tell—you know you said you wouldn' tell, Huck." "Well, I did. I said I wouldn't, and I'll stick to it. Honest INJUN, I will. People would call me a low-down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum—but that don't make no difference. I ain't a-going to tell, and I ain't a-going back there, anyways. So, now, le's know all about it" (Twain47). This quote is a Huck vs. the World example, meaning Jim puts him into conflict with the ethical system he's used to. As seen throughout the novel Huck chooses to do the right thing and keeps his promise with Jim along with befriending …show more content…
Huck did things that the average person, of that time, would never even think to do. These things included: lowering himself to a black man, feeling guilt towards thieves and feeling bad about something that he is conflicted about himself. These conflicts are things that many wouldn’t even consider. At the same time Huck is still finding himself and is understanding what it means to be a righteous person. At the end we see that Jim becomes somewhat of a father figure to Huck. At this point the reader can understand that Huck is not racist and has leveled himself to Jim, which is just understanding Jim is a human and not property. In this novel Jim gives a wacky quote saying, "Dah you goes, de ole true Huck; de on'y white genlman dat ever kep' his promise to ole Jim" (104). What Jim is saying is that Huck, despite all the lies, is probably the most moral person in this novel and quite possibly the entire pre-Civil War South. This quote is short, yet extremely powerful because it proves to Huck along with the reader that what he is doing is right and that this is truly a moral

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