Moral Issues In Alice In Wonderland

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Lewis Carroll’s real name is Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. He was born on January 27, 1832 in Daresbury, Cheshire, England. Carroll was not only a children’s writer, but a photographer and mathematician. Carroll is the son of the Reverend Charles Dodgson and Frances Jane (Lutwidge). Carroll suffered from a stutter and was deaf in one ear. He had ten brothers and sisters and was the third oldest. This contributed to his wild imagination because he would make up stories and games for his younger brothers and sisters. Carroll was taught lessons from home when he was younger, and then attended the Rugby school. In 1850, he went to Christ Church in Oxford. Later, he became a mathematical lecturer at Oxford. With this, Carroll became recognized as an …show more content…
Two critics named Charles Frey and John Griffith believe that, “Alice offers to readers... a splendid opportunity to learn respect instead of suspicion for one of the great modes of literature, satire” (Frey and Griffith). Presenting this type of literature to young readers will give them a better understanding of the absurdity of adulthood and the corrupt judicial system of Victorian England. In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the Queen of Hearts symbolizes English authority and the corrupt manner in which decisions are made. Carroll shows us that people in high positions of power can make illogical decisions when the Queen of Hearts declares, “Sentence first — verdict afterwards” (Carroll 140). This backwardness draws attention to the unjustness of the British legal system. Frey and Griffith also believe, “when she begins meeting the generally rude and eccentric creatures in Wonderland, the equation of satire shifts from bemusement at Alice 's ignorant innocence- toward a special combination of laughter at antics of the brusque, logic-chopping creatures” (Frey and Griffith). This supports my opinion that satire is found in the absurd antics of the characters. When Tweedledee remarks, “Contrariwise, if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn 't, it ain 't. That 's logic.” (Carroll 189). The characters seem to provide preposterous theories and possess little …show more content…
She is a seven year-old girl who lives in an upper-middle-class family in Victorian England. Alice adores her cat named Dinah and has a sister that is not interested in playing imaginative games like Alice does. Her personality is: curious, imaginative, sensitive, bold, and confident. Alice’s behavior is very strong for a child of her age. She is very inquisitive, humorous, and keeps with her a sense of reason and justice. She isn’t afraid to speak her mind and even says to the Queen, “Why, you 're not a queen, but just a - a fat, pompous, bad tempered old tyrant” (Carroll

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