Moral Dilemma Of Euthanasia

Improved Essays
Moral dilemma? One of the major antithesis of PAS or euthanasia is the “slippery slope” argument. This argument questions doctors “playing God” or as discussed previously, potentially going against their sworn oath, which would leave a shortage of available physicians to administer the treatment. Successful programs in many countries have shown that there is no shortage of physicians willing to do what they feel is the right thing in regards to their patients to end their suffering. It is seen by many as an act of mercy. Even in the United States, the states with approvals have reported no issues of having enough medical practitioners to carryout out the approved PAS and euthanasia procedures. Those against this process also state that …show more content…
Interfering with nature is said to be against most of these beliefs. One problem with this argument is that seeking medical treatment from the beginning could be viewed as interfering with a higher power or nature. There’s also the argument that hospice care is the same thing. Many religious hospitals have hospice care centers which is where patients ultimately go to die. Medical treatments will not extend their life or cure them, so they essentially remove any treatment and go somewhere more comfortable to wait out their last days with family. This is just a slow, potentially more painful, and definitely a longer and more drawn out version of the same process. Giving pain meds for comfort and anti-depressants for sedation, often time patients are completely sedated and sometimes given far more than normal amounts of these medications to be kept comfortable. Ultimately, these patients will likely die of dehydration due to lack of fluids and IV’s. Their illness is not what killed them, it was the lack of medical assistance, food, and water. It seems hypocritical to allow the drawn-out version of the same solution with the possibility of causing pain to the patient by depriving them of water, but not to allow their end to be peaceful with a guarantee of comfort without pain and further …show more content…
Life can change in an instant. A terminal diagnosis or a debilitating accident can happen to anyone at any time and it is healthy to know what that persons wishes are. If an accident renders a person unconscious for a great length of time, someone will have to be appointed (if they have not been already) to make medical decisions and advocate for them. Even if PAS or euthanasia are not your personal choice, you may want to have a “DNR” order which means Do-Not-Resuscitate in place. This order gives medical personnel instructions to not take any kind of measures to revive you in the event that your heart or breathing stops. Many patients chose this option due to not wanting to interfere with “God’s” plan, or simply not wanting to live in a possible state of poor health due to the medical situation they have experienced. Even if end of life wishes have not been discussed, a person having a DNR on file can be seen as a clear sign to family members that a person does not wish for their life to be extended artificially – or by medical technology. This is where CMO’s and CSD’s sometimes are used for those against PAS and euthanasia. It can be a very difficult decision for family members and it is best if a legal will is in place or wishes were openly discussed to avoid suffering or patient discomfort due to the selfishness of others not being ready to let go. This is also

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Assisted Suicide Analysis

    • 1945 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The AMA supports the removal of such devices because it allows the patient to take up the risk of dying that is part of the illness they have. The reason the AMA supports such actions, but they do not support assisted suicide is because when a doctor removes the breathing apparatus, he or she are not removing the devices with specific intent to kill the patient (Karaim, 2013, p. 457). Even though the American Medical Association does not support assisted suicide, some bioethicists believe that medical care needs to include and recognize that death is inevitable and physicians need to respect a patients wish at the end if their life. (Karaim, 2013, p.…

    • 1945 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dignity Vs Euthanasia

    • 2009 Words
    • 8 Pages

    However, hospice nurses in Oregon do not like the Death with Dignity Act and some refuse to talk about to their patients because they don’t want to see them die that way. When a patient asks in hospice that they want to go through euthanasia they bring in a doctor that is available to commit the suicide on the patient. The hospice nurses usually do not do anything with euthanasia because it is not part of their job description. Patients are to asked the nurses if they want assisted suicide and when death option are given like, if being connected to life-support it is up to the patient. Hospice has four principals when a patient asks for euthanasia.…

    • 2009 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Proper pain management will not alleviate all patients from suffering A. Those who oppose euthanasia argue that proper pain management is enough to make the legalization of euthanasia unnecessary. B. I argue that this is a narrow definition of suffering that only focuses on the physical pains leading up to death and not the emotional or mental pains. C. Suffering is not always a matter of pain, but insecurity over when a terminally ill patient will die. The Hospice Foundation notes that the best pain cure will not always lessen pain.…

    • 1022 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Arguments Against Pas

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages

    While the medical community does try to save and prolong the patient 's life, when is enough, enough? The article “Should Doctors be Allowed” points out that death is also a part of medical treatment. Death is inevitable and health care professional denying PAS are letting their patients continue suffering and harm, which is not in any way helping them. “Emphasizing the importance of the principle of autonomy, quality of life is a very personal opinion. By preventing clients from taking their life, healthcare providers are being paternalistic and imposing their views onto their patients” (de Vocht et al).…

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, this is inconsistent and falls short of the argument Brockney 3 that promotes euthanasia as a choice all who desire should be allowed. Another potential slippery- slope aspect of allowing euthanasia that is pragmatic is the possibility of laziness. It is widely known that it is within human nature to fall short of expectations at some point. A physician could begin by diligently ensuring that all euthanasia cases are taken care of precisely and carefully, yet, this diligence could eventually become lacking and a patient who does not meet the necessary requirements could lose their life (Lo 154). Opponents of euthanasia claim that euthanasia defies the sanctity of life and the…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many people believe that assisted suicide will downgrade medical technology and corrupt medicine. Medicine could cause the patient 's treatment to prolong his/hers suffering but won’t help anyone if they are terminally ill. It’s a waste of resources which that corrupts medicine and causes a lot of loss of money for the families and patient’s. People say medicine is a tool used for healing, not for killing. They say it distorts doctor-patient relationships, and will perverse incentives for insurance powers. This is not that case-- Medicine is used for healing in only some cases.…

    • 1319 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Passive Euthanasia

    • 2284 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Passive euthanasia is quite common in medical practice. Passive euthanasia is a refusal of using life-sustaining treatment. It also involves stopping the treatment. In these cases, intravenous fluids and artificial feeding should be stopped according to the patient’s wishes. Moreover, doctors are not allowed to try to resurrect the patient if his or her heart or lungs stop working.…

    • 2284 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Euthanasia In America

    • 970 Words
    • 4 Pages

    They believe doctors should not be put in the position to ever kill a patient. That is also where morals play a big role. Even some atheist believe it is against a person’s moral code to do anything that shortens the life of another person. For centuries it has been well known that doctors are supposed to do everything in their power to save the patient. “As far back as Hippocrates, doctors – and their colleagues-have been healers, with special responsibilities for saving, prolonging and improving lives.”(Huxtable, 97).…

    • 970 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    O’Neill also argues that making euthanasia legal would replace “love with law”. If it is legalized, euthanasia can no longer be considered mercy killing. It would replace a decision that should be made with the consultation of family and doctors with one that is monitored by the government and death-sanctioning lawyers. Ultimately, a government does not care about the patient’s life, adding them into the equation would diminish the love and compassion a terminally ill patient should feel at the end of their life. Legalizing euthanasia would only cause more pain as it would introduce more unneeded stress to the patient.…

    • 1295 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Benefits Of Euthanasia

    • 1350 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Some people fear euthanasia could become a way of completely eliminating health care expenses, or could go against religious beliefs (Gormally). Despite what people say, euthanasia could not eliminate health care cost, patients can only be given the choice of euthanasia if doctors have done everything possible to try and treat them and there is still no cure. In time Euthanasia would stop the medical treatments, but the only cost it would be cutting would be the cost of having to watch a loved one laying in a hospital wishing the pain could just end already. Some people feel euthanasia could go against what they feel is religiously correct. Among the people who attend church regularly only 33% regarded euthanasia as morally acceptable (Euthanasia).…

    • 1350 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays