Moral Crisis In Huck Finn's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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In Chapter 31 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck has arrived at yet another moral crisis, unsure what course of action to take. Huck is battling over whether he should turn in Jim or save him. Huck attempts to use the religious belief system within his society to justify turning in Jim, but isn 't able to disregard a friend in need. The relationship Huck has developed with Jim ultimately leads Huck to follow his heart and save Jim. Huck commits this action, believing it will send him to hell, which only exemplifies Huck 's developing nobility. In this episode Huck asserts his allegiance to Jim, ultimately leading Huck down a path of virtue. Although Huck must question himself when saving Jim, it demonstrates the value he puts upon …show more content…
Huck, a naïve and unruly young boy, transforms into a noble character of generosity and kindness, ultimately living up to his moral promise.

Although Huck himself chooses to help Jim, he is baffled when Tom, a "well brung up" person chooses to help him. This reveals Huck 's unsurety of his own decision, still perceiving it as a crime that requires the greatest punishment, eternal damnation. We see this when Huck questions Tom’s decision to help him, "Here was a boy that was respectable, and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leatherheaded; and knowing, and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame and his family a shame, before everybody. I couldn’t understand it… "(292-293). Huck isn 't able to make sense of how Tom, a boy he views as "respectable" and "well brung up" is able to steal a
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Before Tom is able to answer Huck’s questions Huck says, "I know what you 'll say. You 'll say it 's dirty low-down business; but what if it is? I 'm low-down; and I 'm agoing to steal him, and I want you to keep mum and not let on."(284). At this point in Huck’s development he believes that stealing Jim is "dirty low-down business", which demonstrates that Huck uses societies values to determine what is right versus wrong. Although Huck describes his actions as "dirty low-down business", he does it anyway because his truth, which is relative to him, is that Jim is noble and deserves to be free. Huck takes a major risk by asking Tom to help him steal Jim, which exhibits the extent to which Huck is willing to go to save his friend. The feelings that Huck has developed towards Jim have allowed him to neglect society’s standards and make decisions based upon his intuition for good. Therefore this is a large step for Huck in terms of morality because he no longer relies upon society or religion to dictate his decisions. Huck also describes himself as "low-down", which gives us insight to the way Huck perceives himself and how he is fine with being low-down if it means saving a friend. Twain’s use of short and choppy phrases in this text establishes an aggressive tone in Huck’s voice as thought he is defending his views. This style of writing suggests that Huck is

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