Moral And Ethics Similarities

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Many individuals utilize Morals and Ethics similarly. In the event that you look into the meaning of ethics it will reference morals to some degree. Ethics represent right or wrong judgement. Morals are socially and religiously based refinements. The circle of mortality overlaps the circle of ethics which makes similarities between the two. Both terms indicate a learning of good and bad activities yet the establishments of that information is unique. So what makes Morals and Ethics different? Both relate to each other through right and wrong conduct. Ethics allude to rules given by an outside source, such as a set of principles. Morals allude to a person's own standards with respect to good and bad. Both morals and ethics are types of principals, …show more content…
For instance, legal advisors, policemen, and health care specialists all need to follow an ethical code set around their calling, while paying little heed to their own particular emotions or inclinations. Ethics can likewise be viewed as a social framework or a system for satisfactory conduct. In the field of medicine, ethics vary greatly between differnet health proffesionals. For example, A physician is going to be honest with the patient if he asks a question. The Medical Association says in its Principles of Medical Ethics that "A physician shall...be honest in all professional interactions." What this means is a Physician would have to answer questions honestly or try to prevent the asking of a question. The NAEMT's EMT Code of Ethics has no requirement regarding honesty; thus, the EMT following only this code would ethically be free to bend the truth in order to ensure a more compliant patient. An EMS proffesional might try to to find a way to divert away from answering a question in order to cretate a better relationship with the patient in need of medical attention. Look at a potential scenario of a car accident in where both a husband and wife …show more content…
An example of this would be if a terminally ill patient who is requesting that no treatment be rendered, and yet the do not resucitate (DNR) orders presented to you have expired. Legally, you have an obligation to honor the patient's wishes to recieve no treetment, and a moral obligation to preserve life under any circumstances. In such a situation, obviously, legal and moral criteria would conflict with ethical criteria. In situation like these you have to ask yourself "were you able to prove why you thought that the option you chose was absolutely necessary – If it was a “do or die” call, be able to prove it as best you can. You should beable to show why it was necessary that you chose the option you did." If you can confidently agree that you did what was best for the patient and followed the scope of practice and the directive orders than you can walk away knowing you did the right

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