Mood Disorder And Mood Disorders

776 Words 4 Pages
What are mood disorders? How many different types of mood disorders are there? “Mood disorders are defined as a disorder marked by a significant change in one 's emotional state that seriously interferes with one 's ability to function” (Pastorino, 2013, p. 593). In other words, suffering from a mood disorder not only affects your emotions, but it also affects the way that you preform tasks and interact with people on a day-to-day basis. “Mood disorders are one of the more common psychological disorders, affecting approximately 9.5% of adult Americans in a given year” (R. C. Kessler, Chiu et al., 2005). Mood disorders affect many people in the United States alone in a given year. There are many factors that lead to mood disorders. Most of …show more content…
“The DSM-IV-TR states that there are two different categories, bipolar disorder and cyclothymic disorder” (Pastorino, 2013, p. 595)” Bipolar disorder is defined as a mood disorder that includes depression and mania (Pastorino, 2013, p. 595). “Cyclothymic disorder can be defined as a mood disorder that is a less severe but more chronic form of bipolar disorder” (Pastorino, 2013 p. 595). “Bipolar disorders are less common than unipolar disorders, with 2.6% of adult Americans experiencing an episode of bipolar disorder at some time in their lives” (R. C. Kessler, Chiu et al., 2005; Lewinsohn, Klein, & Seeley, 2000). The age of onset where bipolar disorder becomes more common is during late adolescence or early adulthood (Merikangas). According to the World Health Organization, “bipolar disorder is the 6th leading cause of disability in the world and it affects about 5% of the population with dangerous repercussions on multiple aspects in a person’s life” …show more content…
One of these shifts is to a depressed state, with symptoms similar to those of major depression” (Pastorino, 2013, p. 595). When someone suffers from bipolar disorder, this means that the person feels sad and feels useless, as well as changes in sleep and appetite (Pastorino, 2013, p. 595). These symptoms usually persist for over two weeks. The second mood change is when the person feels a “high” or euphoric state, called mania (Pastorino, 2013, p. 595). “During a manic state, people feel elated and have high self-esteem, have a decreased need for sleep, are more talkative than usual, and are highly distractible (Pastorino, 2013, p.

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