Montclair And Social Class

2877 Words 12 Pages
Montclair is one of the most unique towns in New Jersey. People who live in my hometown range from extremely wealthy, living in the estate section, to homeless and living on the streets. Montclair prides itself on being very diverse and is only 60% caucasian. Everyone told me when I was growing up that I was in a bubble; they said that the real world was not be going to as accepting as the town that I am fortunate to live in. Race did not dictate your education and neither did your social class. Every school had a mixture of all ethnicities and socioeconomic classes. I never realized the extent of the bubble until I left Montclair and came to Bucknell. Unfortunately as diverse as my town is, it is also very segregated. The town is split into …show more content…
My father had a very different experience growing up than I did. His mother did not work much besides odd jobs here and there and his father was a police officer. He grew up in a very different lifestyle and was not cultivated at all. Many of his extracurriculars were hanging out with kids from the neighborhood and getting into all types of trouble. His parents used directives and told him things that needed to be done; there was a clear divide between adult and child. His parents “facilitated the accomplishment of natural growth” (Lareau 3). My father grew up very close with the people in his community but has fallen out of touch with many of them. However, his family, including all of his siblings, still live in the same house they grew up in. Many of the people my father grew up with did not make it out of Brooklyn. A few of his friends died from alcohol or drug use and the others ended up like his brother: drunk and living at home. At my grandmother 's funeral in 2007, my dad’s best friend showed up drunk and they got into a terrible fight. I haven’t been around my dad’s old friends since then. When I think of my father, I think about how hard he worked to pull himself out of his social class and create a better life for himself. His parents could not afford for him to go to college so he got himself a job and commuted an hour away to take classes within different universities. I think …show more content…
I am not saying that this is a bad thing; she is extremely smart and paved a good path for me. However, growing up comparing yourself to someone else is never good. When I was younger I always told my parents that when my sister and I were older she would be so rich that I could just live in her carriage house. I never believed that it was possible for me to grow up and maybe have a carriage house of my own. I thought, if anything, that I would end up in the same economic class that my I had grown up in. However, Allie, my sister, wanted a better life for herself. By living under her for most of my life, I thought I could never be at the same level of success as her. She was always the smarter one. It was not until I came to school to Bucknell that I even realized the possibilities that I could have. The reason for our difference in aspirations came from our very contrasting social lives. My sister was never “cool” but she had her close group of friends. All of them grew up in the third and fourth ward, meaning none of them really had any money. The “popular” kids in her grade were all first and second ward kids; the ones who lived in the estate section or were neighbors with Stephen Colbert. Contrarily, I somehow made my way into the more popular crowd in high school. My friend group dominated the sports teams and we were good, giving people a reason to want to be friends with us. Many of my friends were also from the

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