Montgomery Bus Boycott Significance

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“Are you going to stand?” Rosa looked at the bus driver, as he asked her to stand up and with no hesitation she said, “No.” (Reed & Parks 23). Parks changed history with one simple word leading to equality between races and no segregated buses. When looking at the Civil Rights movement in America, it is important to discuss the significance of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the result of the Montgomery Bus Boycott on civil rights, and what did Parks did to help change the world. The history of the Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956) was a signified justice and segregation (King 53). Negroes would be segregated on buses until the end of segregation. It began when a courageous, determined women decided to stand up for what was right. Parks was tired …show more content…
It also brought national and international attention to the civil rights struggles occuring in the US. When the boycott ended, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) worked to end segregation throughout the south. The Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) took the Montgomery situation to the Supreme Court. and “On November 23, 1956, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the MIA, segregated busing was declared unconstitutional.”(UShistory.org). The news spread throughout Montgomery, Some whites disagreed with the decision made but the Negroes knew they have won. Days after the declaration, the whites began to realize that the blacks are not there to harm anyone. They realized that the blacks are people like them. Montgomery’s buses were integrated on December 21, 1956 and the boycott ended, which lasted 381 days.”(“Montgomery…”History 4). The segregated buses were no longer used, due to the situation being unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a change in history, made people realize, and effected the Montgomery community because the Negroes made a decision to not be disrespected anymore had courage to stand up for what was …show more content…
She and her husband, Raymond, were part of an active local association called the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of colored people.) The NAACP was a group formed to protest against racial discrimination, lynching, brutality, and unequal education (Parks 80). The NAACP was very dedicated to their leaders and they would do anything to try and save them from problems. Many of the members of the NAACP were very educational blacks. When Park's first joined, she became secretary of the NAACP. They held a meeting to which Rosa and another women attended, and the men would laugh but Rosa wouldn’t acknowledge them. The leader of the NAACP, E.D. Nixon, would laugh at Parks and he would say, “Women don’t need to be nowhere but in the kitchen.” Parks didn’t care she knew she was there to help others but Nixon saw something in Rosa and told her to be his secretary. Parks knew being part of the NAACP, she would confront the critical civil rights and focus on legal

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