Mominism And Feminist Criticism In Lady Chatterley's Lover

Better Essays
Looking through the lens of different literary theories would disclose information about how literature is examined by different readers. For instance, looking through the perspective of a feminist would lead to better understanding of the foundation for feminist criticism. Likewise, probing through ecological perspectives provide for comprehension of ecocriticism. In Lady Chatterley’s Lover, reading through the lenses of these different literary theories reveal the selections in the novel that would arouse criticism, explain the author’s perspective, or even perhaps demonstrate why this book was banned.
The most obvious literary criticism would be feminist criticism. Throughout the whole book, D.H. Lawrence portrays female characters in a
…show more content…
However, she is constantly tempted by the desires for real human contact. This is demonstrated when she cannot resist the playwright Michaelis and engages in several sexual encounters with him. Connie also has an sexual affair with the gamekeeper Mellors and is even described to be impressed by Mellors’ vitality when she accidently sees Mellors washing himself. Even though Mellors is aloof and rude, Connie is still curiously attracted to him. To feminist critics, Connie’s interest in the derisive Mellors discredit females as weak when tantalized by prospect of sexual pleasures. This discredit of females is further exemplified by Connie’s relationship with Mellors. Their relationship is purely a sexual one. Mellors remains mentally and emotionally distant even though he is physically close to Connie. Connie does realize that Mellors is emotionally distant to her but she still chooses to continue to have sex with Mellors. This paints Connie negatively because she is essentially controlled by her sexual pleasures and cannot stop committing adultery even if it is with someone who continuously remains distant. Lawrence also paints another female character in …show more content…
Through the lens of ecocriticism, the specific environments in the novel not only establish backgrounds for each character and provide for character development but also reveals Lawrence’s stance on industrialization. As Clifford focuses more on his business and begins to seek for money and power, his relationship becomes more distant with Connie. Connie’s first encounter with the wilderness provides her some warmth in her otherwise inorganic life. This is marked by her insistence on getting the key from Mellors to the hut so she can stay in the woods often. At the Wragby estate, she is surrounded by intellectuals devoid of humanity and run by the pursuits of materialism. She is an outsider who does not seek such worldly pleasures. However, Mellors resides in a hut within a forest— a primitive setting that connects Connie to nature. Mellors’ hut and the forest eventually becomes Connie’s “retreat”, a place of “exile” and refuge. Clifford eventually becomes completely insensitive to Connie and his relationship to Connie becomes broken beyond repair. Industrialization takes his humanity away and he becomes a victim of industrialization. He is a living machine incapable of feelings. Lawrence includes a scene where Mellors and Connie have sex on the forest floor. The significance of this scene from an ecocriticism point of view shows how Connie and Mellors are now no longer part of the

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    To be a woman is to be simultaneously hypersexualized and shamed for the sexualization. It is to be called a “prude” if it is rejected while also being called a “whore” if it used as a source of empowerment. There is no middle ground because this sexualization does not stem from women, but from men. Patriarchal power has continually forced upon women what they believe a woman should be, which often is the opposite of man. Femininity is considered to be bipolar of the masculine, so they assume that to be a woman is to lack male desires and characteristics.…

    • 1453 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She states that she can smile, laugh, listen, and marvel at this man’s tales of bedroom conquests, yet it is clear his behavior does hurt her. However, she fakes such false happiness because this is what he expects of her. In line 19 she remarks “Thus do you want me-marveling, gay, and true.” She behaves in the way that pleases him. In contrast to the narrator, the mysterious man is completely unaware of the depth of feelings experienced by his companion. He is not only a womanizer, evident by his tales of late delights with indiscreet ladies, but he also lacks the same level of emotional sensitivity as the…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women are deemed whores for having sex and men are labeled legends. Women are taught that they should be proper and innocent, and not give it up to men, so when they do, it feels wrong and immoral. Women are also taught that men only want sex, so it feels as though they are using women for sex, and no one wants to feel used. Society's thoughts on casual sex must change before our own feelings on it do. Minot illustrates the negative connotations around sex by observing that, “the more girls a boy has, the better.…

    • 1083 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The female is the main character of the story. The way the female character perceives sex differentiates from the way in which the guys she is sexually involved with perceive sex. The nameless girl thinks that she is giving love to the boys she interacts with, while they are purely in it for the sexual pleasure. Confusing love with lust is tragic in some cases and this could cause…

    • 1527 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Calonice and the other women don’t just want to have sex to please their husbands. They enjoy sex, as much as their husbands. That fact is what makes it so hard for the women to continue their sex strike against their husbands. Lysistrata is revolutionary in that aspect —The women are not vilified for enjoying sex, in fact their plan only works because they do. So while the Lysistrata and the other women are decried as temptresses, they subvert the traditional temptress role.…

    • 1548 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Although we may dream of being along side Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games, most would not choose to have the sci-fi film be our own reality. We use porn as an escape from our monotonous sex life without giving up the comfort of repetition and the uncertainty of change. Many women believe that choosing to view the actors in pornography over your partner is an act of adultery. However, these women fail to understand the separation between fantasy and reality. This is mostly the fault of our own society and its expectations of women.…

    • 1433 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As a single woman of an older age in a questionable relationship, Manna is viewed by others as promiscuous or as a perpetual virgin. Ether image subjects her to sexual fantasy or curiosity, which is seen when Lin and Geng Yang are discussing Lin’s relationship with Manna. Geng Yang wants to know if she is a virgin, and even when told that she is, he asks Lin if he is sure (Jin 164-165). Instead of keeping Manna safe within the confines of a socially acceptable relationship that would help men see her as off limits, Lin’s confirmation of her virginity has presented Manna as a sexual prize to Geng Yang. Even though Lin does not realize what he has done, this vulnerability leads to her being raped by Geng Yang.…

    • 1399 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She knew the men would be tempted by her promiscuous behavior, yet she continued to conduct herself inappropriately around men. By Steinbeck admitting she only had one thing to sell, he is admitting that she is nothing more than a flirtatious woman seeking attention from…

    • 756 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In contrast to Desdemona, it could be said that Emilia is a much more opinionated and stronger character. She is actually completely aware of the fact that she is solely being used by Iago for his desires and has not much trust left in the continuing of their marriage. She starts to disobey him, and tends to be more vocal about her own opinions. “Tis proper I obey him, but not now”. (Shakespeare W, Othello) “And although the readers can find a partial rejection of these social norms which let the men decide the women’s roles in Emilia” (Pratap A, Women’s Role in Othello), her brutal honesty and frankness eventually lead to no good when she tries to expose her husband.…

    • 834 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In this pdf, it described the criticism as a way to understand how women’s nature can change in different ways. Tyson explained that feminism can be seen in a wide range of categories such as political and social. “ Because feminist issues so widely across cultural, social, political, and physical categories feminist literary criticism is wide ranging too... both in the past and present, and promote our appreciation of women’s value in the world.” (Tyson 119). An example of how this is seen in the story is when Johanna tells her reader the thoughts in her mind in the beginning of the story. “,,,Johanna thought, usually years too late, or years before one could crack their code or had even learned the language they were in.” (Le Guin 553).…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays