Modernism And Modernity

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Modernity can have a number of different meanings dependent on the context of the text and the period in which the text was written in. With a plethora of meanings, one specific lens for understanding modernity is a deep questioning and challenging of authority. It may be questioning authorities about who we are, how the world works, or how society should work. Modernity brought with it a shift from blind faith in the words of officials to an autonomous querying separate from the thoughts of authorities. In Modernity and the Construction of Roman Catholicism, Joesph Komonchak described this shift to rationalism as “the great enemy of the Church and of the faith” (358). For thousands of years, the church held the power of who had authority, …show more content…
With all the money and land in their hands, the bourgeoisie forced the proletariats to work hours on end to afford the little bit they have (Marx and Engels 227). This uneven spread of goods and land and exploitation of the proletariat group, led Marx and Engels to the idea that “the theory of Communists may be summed up in the single sentence: Abolition of private property” (188). With the current way of thinking that independence of the human person was important, they saw that this autonomy of the human was only relevant to the bourgeoisie – a small percent of the population. With elimination of private property, everyone becomes equalized and eliminates the possibility of classes and the struggle between these …show more content…
Rather than focusing on politics and social structure, Darwin focused on the natural world and the formation of species. He challenges the thinking of the church by arguing against the idea of creation, but yet he still believes in the idea of a creator. Rather than believing all animals were created by God specially, including the human being, Darwin says, “probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth have descended from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed ” (303). The first half of this sentence he is arguing against the notion of the special creation of each creature, but rather the evolution of different species from one original species. This completely contradicts the beliefs of the church at the time, but he still alludes to his belief in an initial creator in the last half of the sentence. Using the words “into which life was first breathed” he hints to more poetic words of the bible. Although he is challenges the ideal of the Church, Charles Darwin does not completely refute all of their

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