Mode Of Production: Marx's Critique Of The Political Economy

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The development of using a media like youtube for adverts is an extremely new outlet. Through Marx, we can see this new outlet as advantageous for the bourgeoisie and ultimately the capitalist economy.
In Marx’s critique of the political economy a term he uses is ‘mode of production’. Mode of production is a combination of the forces of production and the relations of productions. Marx would classify that we still live in a capitalist mode of production, with the relation of productions still existing between the Bourgeoisie and the Proletariat. However since the time that Marx wrote his manifesto the forces of production have changed. Marx explains this change as being a normal part of capitalist growth saying that “the bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionising the instruments of production, and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society”(CM, 476). One of the instruments of production that has been created is the instrument of advertising. Advertising allows for companies to create demand for their commodity. Even more recent, as in the last ten years, is the use of youtube and youtube videos as an additional outlet of advertising other than print and commercial advertising. The article
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In order to sell their product there has to be a demand created. One way of doing this, with the use of youtubers, is the fetishizing of the commodities they are selling. Marx in his Capital, Volume One, creates the idea of commodity fetishism. The main idea of commodity fetishism revolves around the social relationship that takes part in the production of the commodity. Marx states that “fetishism of commodities has its origin … in the peculiar social character of the labour that produces them”(321). So, in contrary to the connotation that “fetish” creates, commodity fetishism is centred around the power that man has given to the commodity to the point of

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