Mlk Vs Malcolm X Comparison Essay

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Although known better for their differences, Malcom X and Martin Luther King had some similarities in their rhetorical style. Both men were respectful toward the law. King does not use the word “respect” so broadly, aimed at government and the law. Instead, he focuses more on people, writing that we are our brother’s keepers. I believe that he meant to show by this that people must give their oppressor’s the right to see for themselves that they are making mistakes, and guide them away from oppression. He gives his oppressors the space to make up their own minds that their actions are wrong and gives them the respect to change it themselves, rather than. be forced to do so. Both men are logical. They say what actions they believe they …show more content…
While King shows compassion for his enemies, Malcolm X shows no such warmth, no such restraint. King tells us that religion makes us our brothers’ keepers, and so we have a moral obligation to help our oppressors to change the thought behind their behavior. Malcolm X makes no reference to religion. While Malcolm X believes in a brotherhood of mankind, he makes no reference to religion and shows no inclination to care for these brothers who would lynch him. By choosing one of the most extreme examples of racial prejudice, lynching, as a basis for his use of violence, Malcolm X shows an underlying anger. King believes that violence, far from solving problems, just creates more, and an eye for an eye just blinds both people. King is optimistic, believing that through non-violent resistance to oppression his oppressors can be led around to see the wrongfulness of their actions. Malcolm X is not so optimistic, and does not believe that oppression can be eliminated using vigilante groups. While King carefully describes the effects of violence on the actors and the recipients, trying to steer people away from that into non-violent resistance, Malcolm X spoke more as a soldier might, leading a call to arms. While both King and Malcolm X showed leadership, logic, intelligence and clear thinking, they both seemed to see different solutions to the problems that black people faced at that

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