Mision San Antonio De Valero

915 Words 4 Pages
The Alamo, which was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero, served as a home to religious missionaries and their Indian converts for many years. Construction of the Alamo had begun on 1724. In 1793, Mexican officials separated San Antonio's five missions and distributed the rest to the Indian residents. These people continued farming the fields that were once the mission's and participated in the growing community of San Antonio In the early 1800s, the Spanish military stationed a cavalry unit at the Mision San Antonio de Valero. The soldiers would soon refer to it as the Alamo in honor of their hometown Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The Alamo’s commander established the first recorded hospital in Texas. The Alamo was home to both Revolutionaries …show more content…
Oftentimes as Americans we tend to exclude certain parts of our history because we either do not agree with them, or because we are embarrassed by them. Examples being, the exaggerations of the Alamo, the Jim Crowe Laws, and the discrimination Japanese immigrants faced during World War II. Our culture now often prefers to hide its past rather than learn from it, which is a tragedy. Instead of teaching of our mistakes and what we can do to prevent them from ever happening, many believe that it is more ‘American’ to hide our past and pretend as though we have never had our share of mistakes and defeat. Ignoring our defeats and mistakes can have large repercussions in the future. The documentary was honest because it stated how the battle of the Alamo had been changed in history. Legends had it that David Crocket had defeated many Mexicans before being killed, but he was in fact bed ridden and taken hostage as he could not do anything, while suffering from tuberculosis. A popular Disney movie portrays him in a way that does not accurately reflect …show more content…
However, there is much to learn from the Battle of the Alamo, and the rich history surrounding it. The Alamo was recaptured by the bravery of the Texans, “For the Texans, the Battle of the Alamo became a symbol of heroic resistance and a rallying cry in their struggle for independence. On April 21, 1836, Sam Houston and some 800 Texans defeated Santa Anna’s Mexican force of 1,500 men at San Jacinto (near the site of present-day Houston), shouting “Remember the Alamo!” as they attacked. The victory ensured the success of Texan independence: Santa Anna, who had been taken prisoner, came to terms with Houston to end the war. In May, Mexican troops in San Antonio were ordered to withdraw, and to demolish the Alamo’s fortifications as they went.” (History.com) Although we had originally lost, we recovered the Alamo and were able to become our own country for a period of time. Eventually, The Alamo was renovated and became a popular tourist attraction, as it has a large significance in Texas’s

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