Gothic Elements In Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey

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Also becoming an example of juxtaposition by taking the word heroine and putting nonassociated words with it. In addition, the main theme of this genre is mystery, in Austen’s novel she makes it blatant the over exaggeration of events and their nonrealism based on Catherine creating misconceptions about the Abbey. These ideas are an influence of the mystery packed, Gothic novels that were the craze of the time; Catherine yearns for adventure and subconsciously creates her own based on what she reads.”[Northanger Abbey’s] long, damp passages, narrow cells and ruined chapel… she could not subdue the hope of some traditional legends, some awful memorials of an injured and ill-fated nun” (Austen 115). Furthermore, Austen’s use of humor when juxtaposing …show more content…
The author accomplished this by giving Catherine Morland a roller coaster romance with Henry Tilney that fortunately ended happily even though it had some rough patches along the way. The advantage of Austen including humor and romance is it results in her stories being relatable to the everyday reader. One does not have to be of the highest social class or have education to understand the humor, setting, characters and events. The era of Gothic literature majorly inspired and created her unique and acclaimed stylistic voice in her novels. Within the novel Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen employs extensive rhetorical devices and literary elements to establish the storyline, purpose, and themes of her writing. One of the most evident devices Austen cleverly uses is the narrator directly referring to the reader in order to make sure they understand certain points and to foreshadow. Speaking to the reader is a creative way to foreshadow future events that will occur in the story. This benefits the plot because it causes readers to focus in on certain aspects and characters resulting in being more drawn into the story. “... give [a] description …show more content…
Originally Jane Austen submitted this novel to publishers under the name of Susan in 1803 but was turned away(Bander ¶ 1). After her move to Chawton Cottage around 1810, she revisited past works; in 1816, with the help of her brother Henry, who helped her become published, she bought back the rights to her manuscript Susan (¶ 12). By this time she had already published multiple novels which is shown through the creative style in this piece. Northanger Abbey was one of the last novels she completed before her death and was published alongside Persuasion. Originally these two novels were published within the same binding even though they are both two volumes each. Researches are still unsure as to why this was, just one of the many things that makes Jane Austen interesting. Unfortunately, like many artists and fellow authors, Austen was not highly recognized for her unique literary style until after her death. One of the first reviews of this piece and Austen herself was written by Richard Whately, an English rhetorician, economist, and religious reformer, in his 1818 quarterly review. In this review he thoroughly analyzes Austen’s writing and explains what causes her to stand out. He uses a wide variety of adjectives to describe her novels as having “vivid distinctness of description”, and “minute fidelity of detail” representing his great admiration of her work

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