Miranda V. Arizona Case Study

1974 Words 8 Pages
1) The Supreme Court case, Miranda v. Arizona (1966), established a set of procedures required for law enforcement to follow when notifying a suspect of their rights before entering custody or undergoing custodial interrogation (Rennison, C. M., & Dodge M. (2016). Introduction to Criminal Justice: Systems, Diversity and Change [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from https://webcourses.ucf.edu/courses/1219517/files?preview=58654921). The Miranda Warning is as follows: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you. Do you understand the rights I have just read to you? With these rights …show more content…
Otherwise, Miranda doesn’t apply and they’re not required to be read” (Baorne, 2016); therefore it is not required to give the Miranda warning as soon as an individual is placed under arrest (Barone, 2016). The reading of these rights came about through the Miranda v. Arizona case in which the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) concentrated on four separate cases concerning custodial interrogations: Miranda v. Arizona, Vignera v. New York, Westover v. United States, and California v. Stewart (Facts and Case Summary - Miranda v. Arizona, 2016). The Miranda v. Arizona case involved a defendant, Ernesto Miranda, who was arrested and then interrogated for two hours until he confessed to abducting and sexually assaulting a woman (Rennison & Dodge, 2016). His testimony was recorded by the Phoenix police and the self-incriminating evidence was presented at trial leading to his conviction (Rennison & Dodge, …show more content…
178). Lastly, the defense may file for federal habeas corpus, which allows the defendant to contest disputes outside the scope of the trial (Rennison & Dodge, 2016). The appeals process for death row inmates “may include up to three courts: U.S. District Court, U.S. Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Supreme Court” (Rennison & Dodge, 2016, p. 178). Consequently, due to the long appeals process, the average stay for prisoner on death row in the United States is between 10 and 12 years (Rennison & Dodge, 2016). Currently, the State of Florida has over 400 inmates on death row, with 160 of the inmates having waited for their execution for twenty or more years, and the State of California has over 650 prisoners condemned to death row (Rennison & Dodge, 2016). Also, according to the text, “Postconviction appeals can cost taxpay-ers nearly $1 million per death row inmate” (Rennison & Dodge, 2016, p. 178). Some argue that capital punishment should not be permitted because of the expenses it puts on the American taxpayer (Rennison & Dodge, 2016). However, most agree that it is a costly process, supporters of the death sentence argue that a “more streamlined process will enhance effectiveness, save taxpayers

Related Documents